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FISHGUARD'S FUTURE. - - -

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FISHGUARD'S FUTURE. THE BUTE AND CARDIFF CATTLE IMPORTS, A correspondent of the Shipping Gazette writes: The import cattle trade at Cardiff has for some little time been at a standstill. For about 12 months there has been no consignment, and it is therefore safe to assert that the trade has terminated. It may come as a surprise to the public to learn that only one licence is held in Wales for the landing and slaughtering of foreign cattle. That is granted by the Chamber of Agriculture to the Bute authorities at Car- diff. Under this licence it is compulsory upon importers to slaughter all cattle within 72 hours from the time of entry to the port. The cessation of the trade at Cardiff has caused flutterings at other ports. Swansea has been moving, the design being to secure the licence which the Bute holders will, no doubt, ere long be asked to transfer or surrender. At all events, pressure is being exerted in this direc- tion. The prime movers in the West Welsh port have received every encouragement from the Harbour Trustees and Corporation, one of their strongest arguments being that a new dock of exceptional dimensions and capacity will very soon be opened at Swansea, and that good and suitable adjoining land is available for the erection of sidings, stallage, and an abattoir capable of dealing with any development of the trade, however large. Up to the present the agitation has proved unavailing. Swansea folk were apparently not aware that a dangerous competitor for the traffic existed in Fishguard. The Great Western Railway Company, having expended a large amount of money on Fish- guard, are deeply concerned in the expansion of its trade. A movement is already well advanced to secure the cattle licence for Fishguard, and to it the Great Western Railway will assuredly give its weighty support. People unacquainted with the geological survey maps and the coal measures of Wales may be ignorant of the fact that Pembrokeshire has several seams of ex- t cellent house coal. In the neighbourhood of Saundersfoot coal is now being worked. Here, again, is a possible avenue of trade which the railway company will not be slow to appreciate, especially if it will afford Fishguard an oppor- tunity of developing a coastal coal trade to Ireland and elsewhere."

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