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DISASTROUS FIRE AT LLANDAFF.

LONDON WELSH FOOTBALL CLUB.

THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE AND…

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ACCIDENT TO A CLEVEDON TRAIN.

A DISQUALIFIED WELSH MAYOR.

A SHIP ON FIRE IN THE CHANNEL.

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A NATURALISTS NOTES I'AROUND…

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A NATURALISTS NOTES I' AROUND TENBY. THE BIRDS OF THE STACK ROCKS. PART II. Next to the Guillemot, the most abundant species on the Stack Rocks are the Razor-bills (Alca tor da), locally known as "Eligugs," while in some districts they go by the more appropriate name of hatchet-bills." These birds belong to the same genus as the now extinct Great Auk (Alca impennis). In colour the Razor-bill closely resembles the Guillemot, except that in the former the brownish black of the head, back and wings,is of a darker obade-but the bill will at once identify the bird, being sharp and flat like a razor or hatchet, thus differing totally from that of the Guillemot as described last week; besides the difference in shape, the bill of the Razor-bill is crossed with a transverse white bar passing across both mandibles, and a narrow white line also passes from the top of the upper mandible to the eye. The feathers on the head and neck of this species, and also on those of Guillemot, are so small and beautifully arranged as to present, even on close examination, the appearance of velvet. These birds breed in similar situations to the Guillemot, but more isolated from one another; indeed, they are too vicious to suffer very close contact with a neighbour. Only one egg is laid. In shape it is somewhat shorter than that of the last-named species and the smaller end is blunter and more rounded. The ground colour is nearly always white—very rarely of a faint greenish blue tint—blotched, spotted, or streaked with various shades of brown or black, the marking often taking the form of a dark broad zone round the larger end. Sometimes the colouring is suffused all over the egg, which is then of a beautiful chocolate brown; occasionally pure white eggs are met with Many persons, even collectors, are often puzzled to separate the eggs of these two birds. Besides the difference in shape already mentioned, there is an infallible test by which blown eggs may be at once identified. If the egg of a Guillemot-one with a white or yellowish ground colour-is held to the light in such a position that the inside can be seen through the hole from which the contents have been ejected, it will be seen that the mem- brane covering the inside of the shell is of a yellowish white colour. An egg of the Razor-bill viewed in the same way will be found to have the inside membrane green, though the outside shell is white or cream colour. Of course those Guillemot's eggs which are of a distinct green will appear of that colour from the inside also, but the Razor- bill's eggs are not found with the same bright green outside—it being the white eggs of the two' species which are so confusing. Like the Guille- mot, this bird lays several times if its eggs are taken, and like that bird takes all its food, which consists of fish, under water; but unlike the Guillemot, which only carries one fish at a time to its young or partner, the Razor-bill will take ten, twelve or even more small herrings every trip. Next in numbers is the Kittiwake Gull (Rissa tridactyra) These pretty lively little gulls nest on the lower ledges and generally in the most in- accessible parts of the rocks. Unlike the two previous species, these birds make a nest of sea- weed and a few grass stems, in which are deposited usually three eggs; these vary in their ground Colouring, being of various shades of brown and buff, sometimes pale blue, blotched and spotted, or lined with different shades of chocolate brown. This species is the latest in nesting, it being generally the middle of June when the bulk of the eggs are laid, about four weeks being required for hatching. The adult Kittiwake, in breeding plumage, has the whole of the head, neck, tail and under parts pure white, back and wings French grey-the latter tipped with black-feet and legs black. The young are covered with yellowish brown down, marked with black spots. The Kittiwake does not dive i8 pursuit of its food, but like other gulls takes it on the surface, or from the shore during the recess of the tide. ( To be continued.) AMPHIBIAN. .IS.

THE AUTUMN MANOEUVRES.

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MONKTON PRIORY CHURCH, PEMBROKE.

CAPTAIN MURRELL AGAIN HONOURED.