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THE WORSTED TRADE AND THE…

THE VALUE OF IMPUDENCE.

DANGLERS.

THE AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT…

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

WE HAVE DONE OUR BEST.

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WE HAVE DONE OUR BEST. We certainly have exerted ourselves for the Sultan. We have freely accorded to him all the honours that the most ambitious and most jealous of his Imperial brothers could expect at our hands. He has been lodged and has held Court in the Palace, under the shelter of his own flag, and has been escorted to and fro as the Sovereign is escorted only on the greatest occasions (remarks The Times.) Her Majesty, with an effort which her subjects will gratefully appreciate, has entertained him at Windsor, and invested him with a Christian Order, a century older than his own throne, in the presence of her own navy at Spithead. That Review was on a scale to make it an event in our history, and the Review of our Volunteers and House- hold Troops at Wimbledon was hardly less remarkable. The City of London has done all that a wealthy and hospitable city can do, and more than it has done for a long succession of illustrious strangers. The Indian Government has received the Sultan in a manner befitmg the Empress of India, and the Sovereign of nearly as many Mahomedans as even Abdul-Aziz holds under his sway. The great palace of the people at Sydenham has taxed all its energies and resources to do honour to the Sultan, and to show how the West can vie with the East in its own taste and fashion. The Sultan has seen our great dockyard and arsenal—those of our public exhibitions that have alone a world-wide fame and character. We had to do much, and so had our visitor. It is not in mortal man to apprehend, to appreciate, and to enjoy all the grandeur, all the merits, all the art and science, all the military and naval resources, the magnificent hospitalities, the municipal dignities, the private enterprise, the most remarkable achievements, and the general happiness of a great people in ten days. No brain can expand of a great people in ten days. No brain can expand to the effort, no senses take in distinctly the over- powering mass of impressions. Perhaps in mercy, but certainly to our own great disappointment, almost every spectacle has been more or less marred. Wind and rain prevented manoeuvres both at Spithead and at Wimbledon. But these were trifles to the calamity which fell on the Sultan's own Representative, and which nmst sadden all recollections of the Indian Ball. While Empires have been exchanging good offices, and the Kings of the earth have been gathered together in token of peace and progress, the course of human affairs has not been interrupted; the elements have not been hushed the shaft of death has not been averted all things have gone on as usual, for good or for evil,

THE LATE TRIAL OF BEREZOWSKI.

A WITCH STORY. ---

THE DEATH OF THOMAS FRANCIS…

AN ALGERIAN STORY. -----

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