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THE WORSTED TRADE AND THE…

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THE WORSTED TRADE AND THE PARIS EXHIBITION, A deputation from the Bradford Chamber of Com- merce have just presented to the council )f that body a report in reference to those departments of the Paris Exhibition which concern the worsted trade for the Bradford district—viz., wool, machinery, tops and yarns, woven fabrics, and dyeing and finishing. Of machinery they state that for general purposes the best looms shown are, beyond comparison, those by trie well-known makers of the Bradford district, the demand for which for exportation continues from every foreign country competing in the production of worsted yarns. Of tops and yarns, the report states that there are exhibited in large quantities, especially by France, every description, except alpaca, which they do not as yet succeed in spinning. In Roubaix mohair has recently been spun to a very small extent, and con- siderable progress has been made in spinning the coarse wools on the mule, and the better numbers on the English throstle frames. But, though the Roubaix spinners are evidently paying great attention to the spinning of a long wool, they have not yet attained the Bradford standard. Franee. however, preserves the same superiority in the spinning of fine yarns for all wool goods which England shows in yarns for mixed fabrics, and is closely followed in this respect ty Germany. Of woven fabrics the report states that hranee clearly maintains her long-established superiority in the finer all-wool plain goods, and this, not by the in- troduction of any special novelty since 1^62, but by the cheapness and beauty of fabrics produced in merinos, reps, poplins, &c. And it is also equally evident that in mixed Bradford goods, France, though not, perhaps, approachiu ut more nearly than she did in some few things t, -it 10 Aown in 1862, yet has made an approach e 1\11; t.• j ■ general and on a vastly larger scale. 01. r) j* Itvever, it may be said, firs' that her \v «' 3 exceedingly similar in colouring ano U 11 o those of this district and secondly5, to at mere is no means of applying the final test of prices, inasmuch as no prices are given that are of any avail in making a comparison, But it must at the same time be recognised that Roubaix, the. Bradford of France, has displayed great energy and skill in competing with goods admitted under the commercial treaty. Indeed, it is stated on good authority that Roubaix has increased her ma- chinery fivefold since 1862. Her success proves in the most striking manner both the advantages of a whole- some competitive stimulus and her ability to hold her own market without the adventitious aid of a pro- tective duty of 10 per cent. Of dyeing and finishing the report states that, as to the dye and finish of mixed fabrics, the same observa- tions apply as to the manufacture of these goods, and there is nothing in the Exhibition superior in these respects to the dye and finish of the goods shown by the Bradford Chamber of Commerce. The deputation express regret that there is no effort on the part of the Bradford trade, which have great facilities to do so, to compete to supply all-wool goods, some of which, as produced by France, have obtained a remarkable hold on the English market since 1862, and also express gratification at the fact that, notwith- standing the remarkable progress made under the Commercial Treaty in France, as illustrated by the trade of Roubaix, they had discovered nothing in the Exhibition to indicate a probability that Bradford was likely to be distanced in the production of mixed Brad- ford goods as a matter of skill and taste.

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