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PARTICULARS OF THE EXECUTION…

HEAVY DAMAGES AGAINST A RAILWAY…

MURDER AT ST. HELEN'S.

CHARGE OF ARSON.

BORROWING HALF-A-CROWN!

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BORROWING HALF-A-CROWN! At the Middlesex Sessions, in London, John Harris, aged thirty-eight, has been charged with stealing one sovereign in December, 1864, belonging to Mr. Whittell. This was rather an extraordinary case, not only from the lapse of time since the offence was committed, but from the circumstances connected with the prisoner's apprehension. The prosecutor is a builder, and at the end of 1864 or beginning of 1865, lived at 21, Smith-street, Chelsea. One afternoon, when his wife was at home, the pri- soner called, and learning that Mr. Whittell was ab- sent, expressed his regret, because he particularly wanted to borrow 2s. 6d. to make up an amount which he was going to Paddington to pay. He also said he represented a city firm with whom Mr. Whittell dealt, and he offered to leave his umbrella as security. Mrs. Whittell took out her purse and said she had only a sovereign. He said he could give change and produced some silver. The sovereign was placed on a table. At that moment Mr. Whittell arrived, and the prisoner shook him by the hand as if he were a friend. Mr. Whittell did not know him. He said, Oh, you have forgotten me, but you know my firm very well." At the same moment he swept up all the money, but acci- dentally dropped a two shilling piece, and, without stopping to piek it up, hurried from the house. Mrs. Whittell then told her husband that he had taken the sovereign. Mr. Whittell went to the door, and the prisoner, who was about fifty yards down the street, on seeing him ran away. A sharp pursuit for 300 yards ensued, but the prisoner escaped. In September, 1866, Mr. Whittell changed his address, and went to live at Gough-house wharf, Chelsea. One evening in April, 1867, the prisoner called there, talked of ordering drain-pipes, and again wanted to borrow 2s. 6d. to go to Paddington and to leave his umbrella as security. Mrs. Whittell recog- nized him and said, "That's the man who had my sovereign whereupon the prisoner again ran away and was again unsuccessfully pursued. On Saturday, the 14th of June, Mr. Whittell saw him in the Fulham-road and spoke to him. He denied all knowledge of Mr. Whittell, but that gentleman insisted on having his name and address, or going to a police station. The prisoner got into a Hansom cab. Mr. Whittell stepped up behind and told the cabman to go for a policeman. The prisoner told the cabman te knock' him off the step, and when the cabman re- fused struck at him with his umbrella. Mr. Whittell would not leave, and after the prisoner had ordered the cabman first to drive to Clapham and then to Pad4ington, a policeman was found in High-street, Kensington, and the whole party went to the station. The prisoner gave the same name which he had given in April, but refused his address, although Mr. Whittell said if he would refer to any one of respectability he would not charge him. He subsequently offered 51. to the pro- secutor to forego the charge, and appealed to him whether he had never been hard up and wanted to borrow half-a-crown. At the police-court he told the magistrate that he ran away the first time because he wanted to take an omnibus, but Mr. Whittell proved that he ran past the KmgWoad, where omnibuses do pass and was lost sight of in a side street. He called himself an architect and surveyor and said on the 14th of June that he had only j ust come to London. A witness proved that in December last he took lodgings, and said his name was Pelham. The jury found him Guilty. It was stated that in many other cases he had obtained money in the same way. The judge sentenced him to be imprisoned and kept at hard labour for twelve months.

A PAINFUL CASE.-SENTENCED…

THE REVIEW AT WIMBLEDON.

A CODICIL TO HIS WILL! ,

IK THE MIDST OF LIFE," &c.