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FEMALE EMBELLISHMENTS.

GOSSIP ABOUT THE EX-KING OF…

TRAVELLING COMPANIONS.

VINEGAR HILL IN 1798.

BRUIN AND THE BULL.

FRENCHMEN IN LONDON.

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FRENCHMEN IN LONDON. A Frenchman writing from London addresses Le Sport with the following sketch of high life in London:- The English mode of living consists of numerous re- pasts without much flavour, and a turn in Hyde Park on foot, on horseback, or in a carriage. The amazons and cavaliers may be seen at midday in the privileged ride and at five o'clock a crowd of carriages in what is called the "drive." Sunday, however, is 10 an exception to the ordinary rule, and the fashionable world on that day visit the splendid Zoological Gardens in Regent's Park; that is to say, when a dinner at Greenwich or Richmond has not been arranged. The matinees, however, are much in use among the English aristocracy. The Marquis of Westminster, who owns the land of no inconsiderable portion of the vast City of London, which on the fall- ing in of leases will be worth somewhere about a mil- liard of pounds sterling, held a very numerous gather- ing of this description before his departure for the country. Many of the most eminent politicians and wealthy lords whose names are found in the pages of English history were present, as well as the Duchess of Cambridge. Visitors promenaded the saloons and refreshed themselves at buffets laden with rare and splendid fruit, pastry, ices, and the wines of France and Spain. The admirable picture gallery, containing the ekef,i d'(rtv)-e of Rubens, Titian, Vandyke, Murillo, Hob- bem a, and Salvator Rosa, was inspected with the liveliest interest then the company sought their carriages, after lingering a tolerably long time among these pictorial treasures of art. We must acknowledge that we failed to meet either at this matinee or in other salons those fine specimens of young English girls which were so numerous a few years ago. There are still some young beauties to be seen, but they are rare —rarer, perhaps, than in Paris. They are almost all of them tall and slim, well made, and whose general expression is calm and thoughtful. Dinners are frequent, and the more distinguished aristocracy are invited out almost every evening. During the past fortnight there have been several balls and concerts of the highest class in the fashionable world. Such vast numbers of persons are invited to the balls that the women take their seats on the stair-steps and the men are obliged to stand.

THE TRADES' UNIONS.

THE SULTAN'S OPINION OF FRANCE.…

TWO SIDES TO A STORY.

MORTALITY AMONGST MARRIED…

THE SULTAN'S THOUGHTS.

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