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FEMALE EMBELLISHMENTS.

GOSSIP ABOUT THE EX-KING OF…

TRAVELLING COMPANIONS.

VINEGAR HILL IN 1798.

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VINEGAR HILL IN 1798. The following is from" Recollections of the Summer of 1798," in Chambers' Journal:— This hill lies close to the town of Enniscorthy. It is not high, but rather steep, and the rebels were as- sembled on it in thousands. They seemed to have a few tents made of blankets, but the greater number were in the open air. I could see that some were cooking at large fires, while others lay scattered about, sleeping on the ground. It was about sunset when we were taken to the hill, where the men who were our fellow-prisoners were separated from us, and driven like sheep higher up the hill; whilst we, and many more women and children, were ordered to sit down in a kind of dry ditch or trench about half-way up it. We had not been long here, when we were accosted by a female neighbour named Mary Donnelly she was a Roman Catholic, and had come that day to join her husband on the hill. She wept over us, and sat down close to my mother, who, feeling that her presence was a protection, would cower down beside her when she heard the slightest noise and the entire of that night we heard fearful sounds above us, as the men who were brought with us to the hill were massacred one by one. We could hear plainly the cries of the mur- dered, and the shouts of the executioners. Towards dawn, I saw in the bright moonlight what terrified mn more than any sight I had yet beheld: I saw a tall white figure rushing down the hill directly towards us as it came nearer, I saw it was a naked man, and I felt my heart die within me, for I thought it was no living being. He passed so close to me that I could see the dark streams of blood running down his sides. In a few seconds the uproar above showed that he was missed, and his pursuers also passed close to us. One saw me looking up, and asked had I seen any one run past, but I was given courage to deny it. This-as I afterwards heard—was a singularly fine young man, not quite twenty, named Horneck, the son of an estated gentleman in the neighbourhood. He had been piked and stripped, but recovering, had fled thus from the hill. He waded the Slaney, and ran six miles to the ruins of his father's house, where his pur- suers reached him, and completed their work of destruction.

BRUIN AND THE BULL.

FRENCHMEN IN LONDON.

THE TRADES' UNIONS.

THE SULTAN'S OPINION OF FRANCE.…

TWO SIDES TO A STORY.

MORTALITY AMONGST MARRIED…

THE SULTAN'S THOUGHTS.

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