Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

12 articles on this Page

MR. PEABODY AND THE BANK OF…

MEMENTOS OF A DECEASED ARTIST.

ADVICE TO BATHERS.

News
Cite
Share

ADVICE TO BATHERS. Bathers are reminded by the Field that their pastime is by no means devoid of danger to health, indepen- dently of the risk of drowning. Where there is any organic disease of the heart, or where there is any apopletic tendency in the condition of the vessels of the brain, the greatest care ought to be exercised at all times. Immersion of the head before the rest of the body is a precaution against the latter which will seldom^ fail if the plunge is made once only, and the water is left immediately but this organ serves no gowl purpose in relieving the heart; for, unfortunately, this is in still more danger of congestion when a plunge is made than when the body is gradually immersed. If there is the slightest suspicion of disease, a physician should be consulted before bathing is attempted, and his directions should be rigidly followed. It is a very common though erroneous belief that cold water is dangerous if applied to the skin immediately after ex- ercise, and this often leads to the postponement of the bath until the circulation is reduced so low that reac- tion does not take place, and a dangerous congestion occurs in the large vessels lying within the chest or in the head. The best time for bathing is early in the morning, before the fatigues of the day have had time to act on the circulation, or a full meal has called upon the stomach to demand its necessary supply of blood, abstracted from the general circulation. In healthy persons, especially during early youth, bathing is safe at all hours but, as we do not all know the exact state of our vital organs, and in many cases it is not safe for the physician to inform us of the extent to which disease has gone, the better plan is to avoid unnecessary risks, and, if we bathe on our own responsibility, and without medical advice, to select such hours of the day as are most suitable for it. An hour or two after a moderate breakfast will probably be the time best suited to most people, but this is often extremely in- convenient and the early morning, before the matutinal meal, will then be the next in the order of selection. On no account should the water be entered when the skin is cooled after strong exercise. Immer- sion is tolerably safe if not prolonged beyond a few minutes while the body is still hot, and the circulation as active as ever but where there is the slightest de- fect in the heart, head, or lungs, the water ought only to be entered soon after leaving the bed, and with no more exercise in the interval than a gentle run or fast walk to the water side.

[No title]

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

ENGLISHMEN IN PARIS IN 1817.

THE HARVEST AND THE REAPER,

[No title]

HORRIBLE BUTCHERY BY AN AFRICAN…

THE SULTAN AND THE "GREAT…

WRECKING IN GREAT BRITAIN.

THE HOUSE OF LORDS.