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DREADFUL RAILWAY AGCIDENT…

THE SULTAN IN PARIS.

PRIZE DAY AT THE PARIS EXHIBITION.

SPEECH OF THE EMPEROR.

A CAUTION TO TRADE UNIONISTS.

NEW ACT ON THE SALE AND PURCHASE…

IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY!

TRADES' UNIONS AND EMIGRATION.

CAREFUL OF HIS CHARACTER!

THE SURGEON OF THE WHALER…

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THE SURGEON OF THE WHALER DIANA." On Saturday a special meeting of the Hull Local Marine Board was held at the Board-office, under the pr ssidency of Mr. Atkinson, the chairman, for the purpose of presenting to Mr. Charles Edward Smith, a testimonial, as a recognition of his service as surgeon of the whaler Diana of Hull, which was beset in the Arctic seas during last winter. On Mr. Smith enter- ing the room he was informed that a special meeting of that Board had been called in consequence of a despatch having been received from the Board of Trade, awarding him a testimonial for his gallant con- duct under very trying circumstances. Accompany- ing the testimonial there was a case of surgical instru- ments. The testimonial, which was beautifully illumi- nated, ran as follows To Charles Edward Smith, of Coggleshall, Essex, late sur- geon of the whaler Diana, of Hull, in recognition of his generous, humane, and unwearied services to the crew of that vessel, while they were suffering from a severe attack of scurvy, aggravated by their dangerous position and deten- tion in the ice, and by want of food, clothes, and other necessaries. This testimonial, accompanied by a case of surgical instruments, is presented by the Board of Trade, this 24th day of June, 1867, RieRmoND, President, THOMAS GRAY. Assistant, Marine Department. The Board of Trade had requested that the testimo- nial should be presented in a public manner, and the chairman trusted that through the press the presenta- tion would receive the same publicity which the story of the hardships and sufferings of the unfortunate crew had done. Mr. Smith, in reply, said he was at a loss for words suitably to return thanks for the great honour which had been done him. He could not refrain from saying a word on behalf of the gallant crew, for when he looked back upon that fearful voyage, and the dread- ful struggle they had for life under overwhelming hard- ships, worn out with hard work and constant pumping, with a debilitating disease among them, he must say that the country ought to be proud of those brave men. Captain Allen Young had journeyed to Hull to see the vessel, and he had expressed the greatest admiration for those gallant fellows, most of whom had been reared and trained by that grey-headed old man, Captain Gravill, who perished amid that dreary waste of of snow and ice." In conclusion, he desired sincerely to thank the British Government, through the Hull Local Marine Board.

THE TRIAL OF SURRATT.

HARD-EARNED MERIT!, "I

BREWERS AND BEER.

[No title]

ITHE MARKETS.