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DREADFUL RAILWAY AGCIDENT…

THE SULTAN IN PARIS.

PRIZE DAY AT THE PARIS EXHIBITION.

SPEECH OF THE EMPEROR.

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SPEECH OF THE EMPEROR. The following is the text of the speech delivered by the Emperor Napoleon, on the above occasion:- Gentlemen,—After an interval of twelve years, I have come for the second time to distribute the rewards to those who have most distinguished themselves in those works which enrich nations, embellish life, and soften manners. The poets of antiquity sang the praises of those great games in which the various nations of Greece assembled to contend for the prizes of the race. What would they say to-day were they to be present at these Olympic Games of the whole world, in which all nations, contesting by intellect, seem to launch themselves simultaneously in the infinite career of progress towards an ideal incessantly approached without g able to be attained! From all parts of the earth the representatives of science, of the arts, and of industry have hastened to vie with each other, and we may say that peoples and kings have both come to do honour to the efforts of labour, and to crown them by their presence with the idea of conciliation and peace. Indeed, in these great assemblies, which appear to have no other object thq-II material interests, a moral sentiment always disengages itself from the competition of intelligence -a sentiment of concord and civilisation. In drawing near, nations learn to know and to esteem each other; hatred is extinguished, and the truth becomes more and more evident that the prosperity of each country contributes to the pros- perity of all. The Exhibition of 1867 may justly be termed universal, for it unites the elements of all the riches of the globe. Side by side with the latest improvements of modern art appear the products of the remotest ages, so that they represent at one and the same time the genius of all ages and of all nations. It is universal, for, in addition to the marvels luxury brings forth for the few, it displays also that which is demanded by the necessities of the many. The interests of the labouring classes have never aroused more lively solicitude. Their moral and material wants, their education, the conditions of life at a cheap rate, the most productive combinations of association, have been the object of patient inquiries, of serious study. Thus, all improvements march forward. If science, by turning matter to account, liberates labour, the cultivation of the mind, by subduing vices, prejudices, and vulgar passions, also liberates humanity. Let us congratulate ourselves, gentlemen, upon having re- ceived among us the majority of the sovereigns and princes of Europe, and so many distinguished visitors. Let us also be proud of having shown to them France as she is-great, prosperous, and free. One must be destitute of all patriotic faith to doubt of her greatness; must close one's eyes to evi- dence to deny her prosperity; must misunderstand her institutions, tolerant sometimes even of license, not to behold in them liberty. Foreigners have been able to appreciate this. France- formerly disquieted, and casting out" her uneasiness beyon her frontiers-now laborious and calm, always fertile in generous ideas, turning her genius to the most diverse mar vels, and never allowing herself to be enervated by materia enjoyments. Attentive minds will have divined without trouble that, notwithstanding the development of wealth, notwithstand- ing enticements towards prosperity, the fibre of the nation is always ready to vibrate as soon as the question of honour and the country arises; but this noble susceptibility could not be a subject of alarm for the repose of the world. Let those who have lived for a short time amongt us carry to their homes a just opinion of our country; let them feel persuaded of the sentiments of esteem and sympathy we en- tertain for foreign nations, and to our sincere desire to live at peace with them. I thank the Imperial Commission, the members of the jury, and the different committees, for the intelligent zeal they have displayed in the accomplishment of their tasks. I thank them also, in the name of the Prince Imperial, whom, notwithstanding his tender age, I have been happy to associate in this great undertaking, of which he will retain the remembrance. I hope the Exhibition of 1867 will mark a new era of harmony and of progress. Assured that Providence blesses the efforts of all who, like ourselves, desire good, I believe in the definitive triumph of the great principles of morality and justice, which, while satisfying all legitimate desires, are alone able to consolidate thrones, to elevate nations, and to ennoble humanity.

A CAUTION TO TRADE UNIONISTS.

NEW ACT ON THE SALE AND PURCHASE…

IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY!

TRADES' UNIONS AND EMIGRATION.

CAREFUL OF HIS CHARACTER!

THE SURGEON OF THE WHALER…

THE TRIAL OF SURRATT.

HARD-EARNED MERIT!, "I

BREWERS AND BEER.

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ITHE MARKETS.