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PROPOSED ALTERATIONS IN THE…

WHEAT CROP OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA.…

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES…

IN TIMES GONE BY

KIDNAPPING IN THE SOUTH SEAS.

THE MICE IN THE CABINET.

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

--THE GOLD-FIELDS OF NOVA…

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THE GOLD-FIELDS OF NOVA SCOTIA. It may, perhaps, not be uninteresting to many of our readers to know that within a fortnight's voyage of London new and most important gold discoveries have been made in the British province of Nova Scotia (says the Westminster Gazette.) Six years since the precious metal was found in the sands of the seashore in many of the bays on the Atlantic side of the pro- vince, and this led to the belief that a minute search on the mainland would prove that the rocks bounding the province, almost the whole length from east to west, were auriferous. After much labour, Professor Campbell, of Halifax, reported to the Provincial Go- vernment that he had found gold at many places he had visited specially for the purpose; and within a few months after the publication of his report nume- rous leases were granted by the Crown, and mines were opened at Oldham, Waverley, Renfrew, Mon- tague, Wine Harbour, Stormont, and many other places. In fact, it turned out that the band of meta- morphic rock extending from Yarmouth to Cape Corse, a distance of more than 300 miles in length, by from ten to forty miles in width, contained gold in greater or lesser quantities. Had these discoveries taken place in any other province but Nova Scotia, there would have been a sudden rush of population to the gold-fields similar to that which occurred in Cali- fornia and Australia. Not so, however, here, for the Nova Scotians are a quiet, plodding people, not easily excited, or tempted to leave their homes, more parti- cularly as the gold was found embedded in the quartz rock, and so widely disseminated therein that nothing short of powerful machinery for crushing the rock and apparatus for amalgamating the gold would be likely to pay for working and as the province had but little capital unemployed, nothing of importance was done in the sbipe- of gold-mining for the first year or two. A few Americans, it is true, began to prospect the different districts, and quietly established themselves in the most advantageous positions for working. Some of them quickly realised ample fortunes. Others, not quite so fortunate, work with much perseverance, and are now making large returns on their capital. Many instances could be quoted showing their profits to range from 30 to 1,000 per cent. on the capital in- vested, and some idea may be formed of the richness of these gold fields when it is known that small grants of land, worked only by labouring men without ma- chinery, have been sold, after a few months' working for from 20,000 dols. to 50,000 dols. One of the latest of these was known as the Ophir Company's grant, at Renfrew, within a few miles of Halifax. This com- pany commenced working last September twelvemonth, and the first year's report states that, after paying the expenses of machinery, crushing mills, houses, and plant, there remained in the banker's hands the large surplus of 137,000 dols., or 27,0001." Had these gold discoveries been made ten or twelve years ago, one-half of the unemployed population of the British Islands would have soon been on the way to the golden land, and millions of English capital would have been subscribed for the development of the mines. The recent monetary panic has, however, effectually damped the ardour for speculation; and gold, the great talisman, lingers in its native beds, until some more fortuitous moment shall awaken the British capitalists to the necessity of unloosening the golden treasures buried in the soil of this wonderful province.

PERSEVERANCE DESERVES SUCCESS!

-----,_---MARTIAL LAW.

THE BEAU MONDE IN PARIS!

A CURIOUS VIOLIN.

THE NAVAL REVIEW.

DANCE THE GAROTTCHA.

VERY MYSTERIOUS!

THE CZAR NOT RECONCILED!

AN EDITOR'S REVENGE!

EXTRADITION OF CRIMINALS.