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PROPOSED ALTERATIONS IN THE…

WHEAT CROP OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA.…

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES…

IN TIMES GONE BY

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IN TIMES GONE BY The following short anti-biography of William Lloyd Gar- Maon, The Apostle of the Blacks," from the pen of Harriet *artineau, brings hack to the reader's mind a period not far tt«tant -when the freedom which is the boast of every man W'ho steps on British soil, was not the privilege of the op- 13ressed millions in the land of the "Pilgrim Fathers," but who now, too, happily enjoy that what is every man's birth- Tght:— William Lloyd Garrison was not many years ago a Printer's boy. Now he is a marked man wherever he turns. The faces of his friends brighten when his step is heard the people of colour almost kneel to •Wm and the rest of American society (at least, the slave-holding portion) jeers, pelts, and execrates, him. Amidst all this, his gladsome life rolls on he is too busy to be anxious, too loving to be sad;" he is meek, sympathetic, and self-forgetful. His countenance, of steady compassion, gives hope to the oppressed, who look to him as the Jews did to Moses. It was this serene countenance, saint-like in its earnestness and Purity, that a man bought at a print-shop, where it jvas exposed without a name, and hung up in his par- «>ur, as the most apostolic face he had ever seen. The face was not altered, though the man took it out Of the frame and hid it when he found it was Garrison. As for Garrison, he sees in his persecutors but the Features of unfavourable circumstances. He early satis- fied himself that a rotten egg cannot hit truth," and then the whole matter was settled. Such is his case now. it was very different. He was an obscure student in a country college, when he determined ou embracing the cause of the abolition of slavery. A New England merchant freighted a vessel with slaves for the New Orleans market, in the interval of the annual thanksgiving that the soil of his State Was untrodden by the foot of a slave. Garrison com- mented upon this transaction, in a newspaper, in the terms it deserved. He was, of course, tried for a libeL" and committed to prison till he could pay a fine of one thousand dollars. He was just as able to Pay a million. After three months' imprisonment he ^as freed, by the generosity of Arthur Tappan,_ a New York merchant, who paid his fine for the prin- ciple's sake, and whose entire conduct has been in ac- cordance with this one noble deed. Garrison now lectured in New York for. the abolition of slavery, and Was warmly encouraged by a few choice spirits. He Went to Boston for the same purpose but in that en- lightened and religious city every place in which he could lecture was closed against him. He declared his ntention of lecturing on the common: and this threat procured him what he wanted. At his first lecture he fired the souls of some of his hearers, among others of Mr. May, the first Unitarian clergyman Who espoused the cause. On the next Sunday, Mr. May, in pursuance of the custom of praying for all distressed persons, prayed for the slaves and was asked, in descending from the pulpit, whether he was mad. Garrison ana his fellow-workman, both in the Printing-office and the cause-his friendKnapp—set up the Liberator—in its first days a sheet of shabby paper printed with old types, and now a handsome and flourishing newspaper. These two heroes, in order to publish their paper, lived for a series of years in one room on bread and water, "with sometimes," when the paper solid unusually well, the luxury of a bowl of milk." In course of time twelve men formed them- selves into an Abolition Society at Boston, and the cause was fairly afoot—afoot amidst a series of persecutions. The Abolitionists were execrated and insulted, and foully maltreated by the respectables of a large por- tion of the United States. Gentlemen-mobs (working men were not among them) attacked the meeting- houses of the Abolitionist women, who escaped with difficulty. The houses were pulled down the Aboli- tionists were obliged to suspend their meetings for want of a place t,) meet in. They could hire no public building no one would take the risk of having his property destroyed by letting it to so obnox- ious a set of people. Rewards were offered by the slave- holders, the supporters of things as they are," through advertisements in the newspapers, and hand- bills, for the head, or even the ears of anti-slavery leaders. Families were attacked in their houses. Men were seized by mobs of gentlemen were flogged by Lynch law were driven from the country some were burned to death. So is slavery defended in the Southern States of America. Yet Garrison has never quailed. He has been an object of insult and hatred for a series of years he has borne it unshrinkingly but a kind look from a stranger has momentarily unmanned him. His speech is gentle as a woman's. His conversation is full of sagacity it is as gladsome as his countenance, and as gentle as his voice. Through the whole of his deport- ment breathes the evidence of a heart at rest. Men of wealth and nobility who profess Christianity, yet curse the equality of love, for the preaching which Christ died, bow down the front of your hypocrisy at the feet of the printer's boy The name of Gairison riseth in judgment against you. —— —■—

KIDNAPPING IN THE SOUTH SEAS.

THE MICE IN THE CABINET.

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

--THE GOLD-FIELDS OF NOVA…

PERSEVERANCE DESERVES SUCCESS!

-----,_---MARTIAL LAW.

THE BEAU MONDE IN PARIS!

A CURIOUS VIOLIN.

THE NAVAL REVIEW.

DANCE THE GAROTTCHA.

VERY MYSTERIOUS!

THE CZAR NOT RECONCILED!

AN EDITOR'S REVENGE!

EXTRADITION OF CRIMINALS.