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" IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

The SEQUEL CASE to an ELOPEMENT.

THE NEW BLACK DEATH.

SOMETHING TO BE PROUD OF!

THE LAW OF TRADE MARKS IN…

-__-------DEATH OF A FRENCH…

THE REMAINS OF LOUIS PHILIPPE.

------__--FORGIVE AND FORGET!

THE LATE RIOTS IN BIRMINGHAM.

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THE LATE RIOTS IN BIRMINGHAM. The Recorder for Birmingham (Mr. Arthur Robarts Adams), in his charge to the grand jury on Monday, at the opening of the Quarter Sessions, said Since the time when I last presided here circumstances of a most deplorable nature have occurred in this borough. It appears that a certain person, who considers it to be his duty to give lectures in various towns on points of belief held by a large number of our fellow-countrymen, has, whilst deliver- ing such lectures, made use of expressions which have exasperated to a high degree many of those who hold a different faith, and in some of the neighbouring towns the Queen's peace has been actually disturbed, and in others it has only been preserved by extraordinary precautions. Now I hold that the right of free discussion of all subjects is one most dear and most to be cherished by us all, and I should be very sorry to say one word that would seem to militate against that doctrine, or curtail that right in any degree; but whilst claiming a right to free dis- cussion, all persons are bound so to conduct themselves as not to turn freedom into licentiousness and in my judg- ment, violent attacks, of a personal character, whether upon individuals or bodies of men, are beyond the legitimate use of freedom of speech, and I deeply deplore that at the pre- sent time men can be found who can make use of language which has been stigmatised by the present Home Secre- tary as such as could only be applied to the worst of mankind. Nor do I think that the object of the lecturer is promoted by the use of intemperate or exciting language, as it is surely more convincing to a man of reasonable mind to hear discussion conducted in a sober manner rather than in a high state of' excitement. Yet it does not follow but that the acts of others have been perfectly un- justifiable. I hold that no language, however strong, can justify the ute of personal violence, and still less the demo- lition of property, by bands of men organised for that pur- pose. You will have some bills sent up to you wherein persons are charged with rioting. Now, the law on that subject is as follows If a number of persons con- gregate to do any act, and mutually to assist each other, and they do so in a manner which excites terror in the minds of reasonable people, they are guilty of a riot. The learned Recorder, having detailed the facts of the riot, said:—It is impossible to doubt that these acts amount to a riot. The inhabitants of the borough had to submit to the always unwelcome sight of an armed force bivouacked in the streets. No language that can have been uttered offers the least justification for these tumults, and it is necessary that such riotous proceedings should be restrained by the strong arm of the law. We must all feel that this town has been lowered in the eyes of mankind by these dis- graceful proceedings, and we must all regret that the civil force was unable to cope with the rioters, and that it was necessary to call in the military but I am glad to find that it was not required to fire upon the people, and that in most instances the simple presence of the troops was sufficients cause order to be restored. It is also deeply to be lamented that theological discussions cannot be conducted without using terms of opprobium, and that to confute argU" ments or assertions stones should be thrown at,_ ana violence used towards, opponents. The cause of neither is promoted by such acts; but when will people learn the duty of living in charity with their neighbours? I regret also to learn that during the time when the police were en- gaged in suppressing the disturbances men banded themselves together apparently with the object of assisting the civu force, but, in reality, with greater effect to carry out a moss nefarious design. 1 find that shops have been attacked anu plundered, and houses ransacked, their owners having been driven out by violence. Such acts strike at the very root ol society, and it is not to be believed that they arose from religious hatred, but rather that persons who live by plunder seized that opportunity of carrying on their nefarious trade.

---MR. BRIGHT ON THE HOUSE…

AGRICULTURAITEMPLOYMENT BILL.

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