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" IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

The SEQUEL CASE to an ELOPEMENT.

THE NEW BLACK DEATH.

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THE NEW BLACK DEATH. On the subject of this fatal disease, which made its ap- pearance a short time ago in Dublin, Mr. G. Newnham Woolley, M.R.C.S.L., &c., of Bardney-NVragby, Lincolnshire, writes to The Times:- The village of Bardney, in Lincolnshire about nine miles from the town of Lincoln, was in January last visited with an attack of a disease very closely re- sembling that of the New Black Death, as it is called. It may be interesting to some of your readers, and instructive to others, to give some details of the at- tack. Very early in January we were startled by the sudden and unexpected death of some of the parish- ioners and, although I was not the medical attendant of those who died, it was clear, if only a part of that which was said about the complaint were true, that the disease was one of no ordinary description. Of this I soon had satisfactory proof. A stout, healthy, man, who works in a brick-yard adjoining my resi- dence, came to me one afternoon complaining of sickness and intolerable headache. I gave him some simple remedy, and the next morning he resumed work, but about three o'clock p.m. he staggered into my surgery, complaining of sickness, acute pain in the head (the back part), and complete prostration. I found his pulse weak and very frequent, the pupil con- tracted, the skin moist and bathed in perspiration, bilious vomiting, and he complained of most frightful pain in the head. He was sent home and put into a warm bed, and such remedies used as seemed applica- ble to the case. I saw him repeatedly, and in the night he became delirious—a low muttering delirium. In the morning he was covered with a purple eruption, the weakness intense, and every symptom of approach- ing collapse. Powerful stimulants were administered, and the free use of wine and brandy insisted upon, and he again rallied. The next day he was considerably better, but the skin and scalp, as also the skin over the whole of the upper part of the body, were not only painful to the touch but rendered very sensitive by blowing upon them. The delirium vanished under the use of stimulants and morphia, and in order to lessen the pain a small blister was applied to the nape of the neck, and with the best effects— the free use of stimulants being at the same time continued. The discharge from this blister was of a most fetid nature, and such as I have never before seen in the course of a long practice of the profession for above thirty years. The pain now became decidedly intermitting, and I gave large doses of quinine with morphia., and after a careful and anxious attendance of some weeks I had the satisfaction of seeing my patient again restored to his ordinary health. During my attendance on this case I had eighteen others of the same nature, but varying in intesity, and I am happy to be able to say that all recovered. Within a few weeks of the subsidence of this attack, we were visited by an attack of mild typhus fever. In the first attack, I attribute my success to the fact that by careful at- tention to the symptoms I was able to determine satisfactorily the difference between irritation and in- flammation. I do not believe that at any time there was anything beyond simple congestion, which was safely and surely removed by a small blister. The disease was, I believe, confined to this district. Dr. Lowe, of Lincoln, had some cases in the village at the same time, and was equally successful with myself in the cure. The facts of this attack are certainly very re- markable, and nothing more so than the isolated dis- trict to which it seems to have been ccnfined.

SOMETHING TO BE PROUD OF!

THE LAW OF TRADE MARKS IN…

-__-------DEATH OF A FRENCH…

THE REMAINS OF LOUIS PHILIPPE.

------__--FORGIVE AND FORGET!

THE LATE RIOTS IN BIRMINGHAM.

---MR. BRIGHT ON THE HOUSE…

AGRICULTURAITEMPLOYMENT BILL.

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