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THE NEW BREECH-LOADING COMPETITION.

-----------------_.---MURDER…

THE FARMER'S ANXIETIES.

nE PROPOSED TUNNEL ACROSS…

EXTRAORDINARY DEMONSTRATION…

-------THE CAUSES AND CURE…

---NEWSPAPER SIGNATURES IN…

=:'!t' CHANGES OF THE COUNTENANCE.

---------THE LIBEL BILL.

UNQUALIFIED PRACTITIONERS…

----_----_----_--"----------"MURDER…

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"MURDER WILL OUT!" The extraordinary disclosures concerning the murder of the man Linley, recently made before the Sheffield Trades' Union Commission, will be fresh in the reader's recollection and the following account of the circumstancesattenùing the murder, which was committed in the year 1859, and which is extracted from the columns of a contemporary, will prove interesting :— The dreadful crime which has been confessed by the witnesses Hallam, Crookes, and Broadhead, was one for which an innocent man incurred much suspicion at the time, and underwent the pain and suspense of detention in gaol on a charge of wilful murder. The temporary but only partial recovery of the victim, who lingered for some months, led to the prisoner's dis- charge. It was on Monday, the 1st August, 1859, about ten o'clock at night, that, James Linley was shot in the head, as he sat in the snug" of a public- house. It did not then appear that the wound was fatal, though it was of a most dangerous character. It was at once called to mind that the same man had been tho object of deadly attack on two previous occasions. Once he had been shot at, and another time it was attempted to blow up the house in which he was sleeping. He lived at No. 5, Milk-street, and worked at the Tower grinding- whecl. The third attack upon him, the subject of the recent revelations, was made at Wreakes's Crown Inn, Scotland-street. The ball came through the yard window of the back room where he sat. A man was then seen rushing out of the yard, but he succeeded in escaping, as it seems, unrecognised. Linley was re- moved to Mr. Booth's surgery, where it appeared that the skull was fractured by a wound through the left temple. It had been inflicted with a remarkably small ball, which was not extracted from the head. On the following Wednesday a man named Richard Brown was apprehended on suspicion of being the criminal. He was observed 'a the room where Linley was sitting, both a few minutes before and a few minutes after the shot wiis- fired. The prisoner him- self declared that he was talking to Linley at the very moment he was shot, but unfortunately no one else seemed to remember him then in the room. Two pistols were found in his house—in fact, he told the police where to look for them, on his being asked if he had any. -One of these became immediately a circumstantial witness against him, on account of a correspondence between the peculiar smallness of the bore and the size of the hole made by the shot in passing through the window frame of the snug." The prisoner was brought before the magis- trates at the Town Hall. Linley was alive, but not able to appear. As soon as the surgeon had described the character of the wound, and a detective had de- scribed the pistols, balls, and bullet-mould he had found in Brown's house, he had to be remanded, bail refused. The prisoner was, no doubt, as much at sea as the prosecution in trying to identify the criminal, for he had told one of the magistrates before whom he was taken that "there was a big man came in (into the snug') and supped out of a quart of ale with a man who was sitting in the bar and he (prisoner) thought that man had something to do with the affair." It does not appear, by reference to contem- porary reports, however, that any other person, stout or slender, was more distinctly pointed at in con- nection with the matter. The unfortunate prisoner had still a good deal of trouble before him. On the Wednesday following, when he was again brought up, the evidence against him was apparently strengthened by a witness named Eliza Dewsnap. She was confident that the prisoner was the man whom she saw running out of the yard, immediately after the shot. It was also held to be "proved" that the prisoner had left the room four minutes before the shot entered. He was again remanded in custody, and it was not until Saturday, the 13th, that the magis- trates, having made no further progress in the case, felt at liberty to remand him on bail. The accused, it was then reported, "appeared to feel his position more acutely than on any previous occasion. He kissed two or three of his relatives during the proceedings, and frequently burst into tears." He was still under remand, though at large, from week to week, till the 26th, when Linley was able to appear in court, though so feeble that he was scarcely able to speak. He had apparently nothing to say which could support any charge against the prisoner. The witness Dewsnap had also mysteriously disappeared. Under these circumstances, the prisoner was at length discharged. Brown was then described as a bailiff, debt collector, and furniture broker, and the only shadow of a motive which could be attributed to him as a supposed assist- ant of Linley was some utterly indefinite suggestion of j ealousy."

------__ THE PRESS AND THE…

HOW NEWSPAPER REPORTS DIFFER!

--__-----. ATTEMPTED INVASION…

A CAUTION TO TRADES' UNION…

AN INTERNATIONAL PEACE CONGRESS.

A REMARKABLE DISCOVERY.

----_-PRESIDENT JOHN SON ON…

-----THE LATE ARCHDUCHESS…

A RESULT OF TRADES' UNIONS.