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THE NEW BREECH-LOADING COMPETITION.

-----------------_.---MURDER…

THE FARMER'S ANXIETIES.

nE PROPOSED TUNNEL ACROSS…

EXTRAORDINARY DEMONSTRATION…

-------THE CAUSES AND CURE…

---NEWSPAPER SIGNATURES IN…

=:'!t' CHANGES OF THE COUNTENANCE.

---------THE LIBEL BILL.

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THE LIBEL BILL. The following has been sent to The Times for publica- tion The President, Vice-Presidents, and Members of the Provincial Newspaper Society submit to the Members of the Legislature the following observations with reference to the Libel Bill: They wish to disclaim any desire to open the door to the publication of libels, but they think the present state of the law is so very unsatisfactory that it would be beneficial to the public and to the press were its position more accurately defined. They would repeat the observation made in their circular of the 10th of May, that they should not re- quire any alteration in the law, if the speakers at pub- lic meetings were invariably accurate. No matter how libellous the statement may be, the press is pro- tected by law if it be true. But if the speaker states that which is untrue, the press having no means of sifting the statement, and being often limited for time, may, in the hurry of business, publish a report of an important public meeting, which, though accurate as a report, may be incorrect as to the facts, and for such unintentional error the proprietor of the newspaper may be liable to legal proceedings, while the speaker who has misled the reporter escapes. It is said" Why should newspapers publish these reports ?" The answer is, Because the public require them." The press does not seek greater licence than it enjoys. It only asks a clearer definition of its rights. If the Legislature decides that the press is not to be trivileged in publishing accurate reports of public oeetings, then the newspaper reporters will endea- vour to make them inaccurate by suppressing any- hing which may seem actionable. If, on the other nmd, Parliament should hold that those who are ntitled to attend public meetings, but unable to do so, "we a right to accurate reports of the proceedings, hen it ought not to subject the press to actions for ulfilling an important public function. Newspaper proprietors have no direct interest in an 'xtension of this right. They are obliged to curtail nost of the reports they publish. Their own wishes, aid the taste of their readers, discourage the publica- tion of libels. But it seems inconsistent with public nterests and public morality to oblige them to publish Its an accurate report that which is intentionally altered. The cases in which intentional libels are pub- lished are very rare, and a newspaper proprietor can nave no intention to malign when he merely publishes from the notes of his reporter an accurate account of what is uttered at a public meeting. It would meet one of the objections made to the measure were Parliament to draw the line between nrivileged and unprivileged meetings. The Provincial Newspaper Society adopted some months since a resolution which shows that its members do not desire unbridled licence. It was submitted to the Select Committee, but not introduced into the Bill. They asked for an interpretation clause to the following purport That the words A meeting lawfully convened for a lawful purpose' shall be held to mean all meetings held in accordance with Acts of Parliament and all meetings convened and presided over by the high sheriff or lieutenant of a county, or by the mayor or chief magistrate of any city, town, or borough, and no other." Such a clause would not interfere with the right to hold public meetings, nor would it affect freedom of discussion—it would leave the press in its present position with regard to all meetings not included in the above definition, while with regard to the others, which are mostly of a representative character, in which the entire community is concerned, of which it is important that the reports should be full and accu- rate, the press would be privileged, if it published fair and accurate reports of that which was spoken. The Libel Bill is on the paper for Tuesday, the 25th inst. The President, Vice-President, and members of the Provincial Newspaper Society hope you will attend and support it. JOSEPH FISHER, President, W. E. BAXTER, Hon. Secietary. Salisbury Hotel, London, June 17.

UNQUALIFIED PRACTITIONERS…

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------__ THE PRESS AND THE…

HOW NEWSPAPER REPORTS DIFFER!

--__-----. ATTEMPTED INVASION…

A CAUTION TO TRADES' UNION…

AN INTERNATIONAL PEACE CONGRESS.

A REMARKABLE DISCOVERY.

----_-PRESIDENT JOHN SON ON…

-----THE LATE ARCHDUCHESS…

A RESULT OF TRADES' UNIONS.