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gtdrojjfllitan Gossip.

THE SLADE BARONETCY CASE.

THE VISIT OF THE BELGIANS…

-----._---_--_--MAXIMILIAN'S…

STRONG AFFECTION A CHARACTERISTIC…

;:.,1...... ACTION FOR FALSE…

._--------"MARRY IN HASTE-REPENT…

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"MARRY IN HASTE-REPENT AT LEISURE!" In the Divorce Court, in London, judgment has been delivered in the case of Baylis v. Baylis, Teevan, and Cooper." This petition, by a husband for a dissolution of marriage was heard on the 12th inst., and his Lordship took time to consider his decision, and on Tuesday morning delivered the fol- lowing judgment :— In this case a young man married a woman of loose character, with whom he had lived for nine months pre- viously. After a short time they disagreed about money. He accused her of extravagance, and she accused him of parsimony. At last he broke up the house, sold his furniture, and told his wife she must go and live by herself in the chambers he had occupied when a bachelor in Regent- street. As soon as she went there he set a watch over her, and was successful in a very short time in detecting her in adultery. In truth, she made little concealment of it, saying she must have a protector, and would not live alone. The result is this suit. But the Court cannot grant the petitioner a divorce. It has been sometimes supposed that if a man chooses to marry an immodest woman, he cannot afterwards free himself from her by reason of her unchastity. But there is no such law. Whatever the previous life of a woman may have been, she binds herself by marriage to chastity, and if she break the conditions of marriage her husband is entitled to claim its dissolution. But, on the other hand, a husband is at all times bound to accord to his wife the protection of his name, his home, and his society, aud is certainly not the less so in cases where the previous life of his wife renders her pecu- liarly accessible to temptation. No man is justified in turn- ing his wife from his houte without reasonable cause, and then claiming a divorce on account of the misconduct to which he has by so doing conduced. And this I am of opinion the petitioner did. The reasonable cause he alleges is her violence. But there was at the trial no proof of it. The only witness on that head was a man whom he had hired from a private inquiry office to come and live with him and his wile under the disguise of being his friend. lie was there a week, and spoke to her violence of manner, but proved no personal violence to the peti- tioner. And yet he sent his wife away from him, and much against her will removed her, without friend or society, to a place in which, of all others, she would be accessible to temptation; and, further, though she had given him no reason to suspect her of infidelity, immediately set a watch upon her actions. It is hardly to be doubted that he both expected and hoped that she niight commit herself. What is this but, in the words of the statute, "conrluct conducing to the adultery?" The petition must be dismissed. The costs of the respondent were ordered to be paid by the petitioner, and the Court took time to consider the question of the costs of the co-respondents.

-----.......-THROWING OIL…

The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER…

-..... -------_--.------MEANY'S…

LOST IN THE BUSH.

A GOOD WORD FOR THE HOUSE…