Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

12 articles on this Page

gtdrojjfllitan Gossip.

THE SLADE BARONETCY CASE.

THE VISIT OF THE BELGIANS…

-----._---_--_--MAXIMILIAN'S…

STRONG AFFECTION A CHARACTERISTIC…

;:.,1...... ACTION FOR FALSE…

._--------"MARRY IN HASTE-REPENT…

-----.......-THROWING OIL…

The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER…

-..... -------_--.------MEANY'S…

News
Cite
Share

MEANY'S VINDICATION on RECEIVING HIS SENTENCE. At the Dublin special commission, on Friday in last week, Stephen Joseph Meany was sentenced to fifteen years' penal servitude. In answer to the question whether he had anything to say why sentence should not be passed upon him, the prisoner asked the Court to remember that four judges, as eminent as any on the Irish or English bench, had pronounced against the legality of the trial he had received. One of the judges had said there was not a particle of evidence making him an accessory be- fore the fact in the famous Dublin transactions of March last. He complained that he had not been brought earlier to judgment, but kept in solitary con- finement in consequence of which no decision could be had in his case in the House of Lords this Session. He complained also that the Chief Secretary, pending the result of the case, had stated that his conviction was the most important obtained at the Commission. He would like to be informed by what right a respon- sible officer of the Crown entered his solitary cell in Kilmainham unlooked for, and unsent for, to insult him in his solitude and silence by asking him signifi- cantly if he knew any of the men recently arrested after landing at Dungarvan ? This detective dexterity had not induced a. forfeiture of honour. Six months of solitary confinement had not broken his spirit. He was net a Massey or a Corydon to betray his prin- ciples for the unhallowed Judas guerdon. He would suggest that when persons prayed for a remission of the death penalty they should change the tone of their prayer and petition first in reference to the living death of solitary confinement. When digressing into references to other cases than his own, Judge O'Hagan interrupted him, and he went on to say that he had himself been offered release after six months' im- prisonment for pleading guilty, but he declined the compromise. He claimed further that sentence should not be passed upon him, because he was a declared citizen of America. It had been said in the journals that he was one of a host of plunderers living on the Fenian Brotherhood. In that court and before a Higher Court, he protested that he was never the recipient of pay, profit, or emolument from any political body, and never was the retained officer of the Brotherhood. He came to England on private busi- ness, to see his daughter who was in a religious insti- tution, and the Crown, if they chose, could prove it. Judge O'Hagan, in passing sentence, regretted that a man of such ability should have placed himself in such a position. None of the topics he'liad discussed in any way affected the painful duty of the Court. Meany bowed to the judge, and asked liberty to communicate with his solicitor, which was granted.

LOST IN THE BUSH.

A GOOD WORD FOR THE HOUSE…