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gtdrojjfllitan Gossip.

THE SLADE BARONETCY CASE.

THE VISIT OF THE BELGIANS…

-----._---_--_--MAXIMILIAN'S…

STRONG AFFECTION A CHARACTERISTIC…

;:.,1...... ACTION FOR FALSE…

._--------"MARRY IN HASTE-REPENT…

-----.......-THROWING OIL…

The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER…

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The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER on HOME and FOREIGN POLICY. The Chancellor of the Exchequer was amongst the guests at a dinner given by the Corporation of the Trinity House, in London, on Saturday evening last. In replying to the toast of Her Majesty's Ministers," he said:— I need not assure you that her Majesty's Ministers must be much gratified by the manner in which you have received the proposition of their healths this day, and not the less so because, as our deputy-master has very properly observed, on such occasions as the present their health is given, not as an appeal to party feeling, or the peculiar opinions which any class of her Majesty's subjects may hold, but to the respect and good feeling of the great body of the people who appreciate the efforts of the public servants of the crown who endeavour, whatever the principles under which they work, to do their duty to their sovereign and their country. And, indeed, I can assure you that, to us, it must be much more satisfactory that you should receive such a toast in the manner you have done to-day, totally devoid of any party associations than if it were received on some occasion when we had met together to celebrate the triumph of party or the patronage or propagation of any particular set of political (-pinions. After all it is in the respect of our well-considering fellow-subjects that we must receive our best reward for any exertions we can possibly make and it is to the calin verdict of the unimpassioned portion of the nation that we must appeal for our best justi- fication. When her M ajesty's government acceded to power they acceded to an inheritance of great labour and great responsibility, that under all circumstances must be the inheritance of all who undertake those duties. With regard to what we may have done, the policy of this country may, generally speaking, be divided into two heads-the management of our foreign relations and the conduct of our home government. With regard to our manage- ment of our foreign relations, I would not allude to them, unless I thought that I was echoing not only the universal opinion of all Englishmen, but of the subjects of all countries, that my noble friend near me (Lord Stanley), by his prudent and sagacious management of affairs, has secured the peace of Europe. My noble friend is descended from a race who had something to do with the history of this country in the time of that King Henry VII., to whom the deputy-master has referred, and I will be bold to say that not one of his ancestors ever did a braver or purer act than that he achieved when he signed his name to the late treaty made at London, and which secured the peace of Europe. Witfli regard to our domestic politics, I shrink from any allu- sioll. which may for a moment excite anything like contro- versy-I won't say of expression, but even of feeling. I studiously avoid it. Our deputy-master has referred to my humble efforts during the Session. They have beeu mad* where, quoting the words of the song last sung, The stormy winds do blow. (Loud cheers and laughter.) I can say for the policy of her Majesty's government, in one sentence, that if with reference to foreign affairs it is a policy to maintain the peace of Europe, so with regard to our domestic affairs our policy is to secure the peace of England. It is with that view that we have felt it our duty to introduce that great measure to which the deputy-master has referred; and all I will say of it on the present occasion is, that I hope, as I believe, that it will conduce to the advantage of this country—that it will strengthen the state, and add to the spirit of the community. It is to us a matter of great satisfaction that her Majesty's' government should be remembered on an occasion like the present, and especially in this assembly. The relations of the government of this country with the Trinity-house are of long date. For many generations their most eminent members have been numbered among the brethren of' this society; and it is most satisfactory to them that they should be connected with a corporation which is identified with one of the noblest of our public services in all its branches, upon whose efforts the prosperity of our commerce mainly de- pends, and which, by its accuracy of scientific knowledge, has added so much to the security of this country, and has diminished the perils and has mitigated the sufferings of the mariners of England. I hope the connexion between her Majesty's government, from whatever party they may be formed, and this ancient and honourable corporation will be permanent. I am convinced that if that be the case, they will be bound together by associations which are con- nected with the highest interests of the country. For my own part, I remember with pride that I am one, though one of the humblest of your brethren—and that I have succeeded in the office I hold some of the most eminent men who have been responsible for the administration of the country. On the part of her Majesty's government I acknowledge with cordiality the honour you have done them and I can assure you with sincerity that the consciousness that we possess your esteem and good wishes, whatever may be your political opinions, is the best reward we can receive for the performance of our public duties and the highest induce- ment we can have to do our duty to our Sovereign and to our country.

-..... -------_--.------MEANY'S…

LOST IN THE BUSH.

A GOOD WORD FOR THE HOUSE…