Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

9 articles on this Page

-----------------IMPERIAL…

A PEAN FOR DIZZY.

THE VISIT OF THE BELGIANS…

A SINGULAR CASE DECIDED.

A FENIAN ROMANCE.

A PLEASANT PLACE TO LIVE IN!

CHANGE FOR SOVEREIGNS AT PARIS.

News
Cite
Share

CHANGE FOR SOVEREIGNS AT PARIS. It must be a change to be frowne 1 at instead of fawned on; to hear cries of Vive la Pologne 1 11 instead of Vive VEnipereur to feel that you move among cold-drawn dislikes, voices of condemnation, or silence more significant even than hisses, instead of venal vivas, hired huzzahs," and kotowing crowds of courtiers. We may thank the populace of Paris for treating some of its crowned visitors to this sort of Change for a Sovereign." An English crowd, whatever its class, is too apt to behave as though it thought it even more a duty of loyalty to cheer the Queen's royal visitors than to cheer the Queen herself. It would seem that on the occasion of such visits John Bull suffered under a determination either of loyalty or snobbishness to the head and hands, manifesting itself in alternate cold fits of patient gaping expectation till the strange Sovereigns show, and hot fits of frantic applause the moment they appear. We prefer to John Bull's flunkeyish mobbing, lick- spittling, J enkinsing, and beshouting of exotic Royalties, even Johnny Crapaud's cold silence, or open disapproval of monarchs to whom he bears a grudge. The Parisians, evidently, do not consider that the guests of their Emperor must necessarily be the guests of their nation. In this country, we are so apt, happily, to identify Queen and people, that we consider all Victoria's royal guests-there have not, by the way, been many of them lately—as the guests of John Bull in proprid persond and it is on the strength of this hospitable feeling, let us hope, that we so run after them, so bombard them with civic freedoms, and banquets, and reviews, and street ovations, in the shape of a constant crowd—by no means-of tag-rag and bobtail either-at their heels, a constant detective force of reporters waylaying their movements, and a constant fire of huzzahs deafening their ears, that we forfeit all opportunity of dropping them any hint of what we may think as a people about such little games as the dismemberment of Denmark, or the persecutions of Poland, or any other episode of their reigns which English Liberalism is not disposed to view through Prussian or Russian spectacles. Couldn't we take a leaf out of the French book, so far at least, as to introduce a little discrimination into our treatment of foreign Sovereigns? We need not treacherously shoot at them, but neither need we shout after them so pertinaciously. If we refrain from fling- ing stones at any of them there can be no occasion to pelt them all with such whole-hog adulation. Suppose we considered such visitors as appealing to a British jury, or "putting themselves upon the country," and our demeanour to them as the verdict of the grand inquest of the nation ? A little intermezzo. of solemn silence might be quite as wholesome sometimes and quite as impressive as whole reams of F. O. despatches, or whole tons of newspaper leaders.-Punch.

.Jftkdferous (Skttmtl ftos.

A GOOD HORSEMAN.