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----DEATH FROM A SNAKE BITE.

EIGHT YEARS OF THE COUNTY…

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

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GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE WEEK. (From the Gardener's Magazine.) Celery.—The early crops to be earthed up as soon as the plants have attained a good size. If the ground is dry, give a heavy soaking of water the day before intending to mould them, and be careful that the soil is nearly dry, or at most only moderately moist, when the moulding is to be done. Cabbage.—If there are any vacant plots of ground, and no occasion to crop them with successional summer vegetables, it will be advisable to sow good breadths of Early York, Rosette Colewort, and Dwarf Early York, cabbages. These will come into use in advance of the ordinary winter greens, and will be very acceptable. Broccoli.—The last sowing of Walcheren may be made this week. Any plants remaining in seed-beds must be planted out at once where they are to remain. Broad Beans may be sown for late supply. Runner Beans sown now will give supplies late in autumn, when the peas and early-sown beans are gone. We have for several years past sown on the 20th of June or thereabout, and found the result most satisfactory. Lettuce.—It is a good plan to sow some quick- hearting kinds, such as Wheeler's Tom Thumb, where they are to remain, as the operation of transplanting tends to cause them to "bolt." Dig and manure the ground, and sow them in drills a foot apart. As soon as large enough to handle, thin them to six inches apart. f Begin to draw for use as soon as they show a tendency to hearting, which will give more room to those that remain. Lettuces to be transplanted from seed-beds » now should have a very rich soil, and if possible a shady Position, and abundance of water. If they can be kept from bolting, they will form fine hearts very quickly. The best preventive of bolting is to keep them growing fa.st, and manure, moisture, aud shade are favourable agencies. Leeks to be planted out from seed-beds on deep rich soil on dry stony ground they should be put into well-manured trenches in the same style as celery, but on ordinary good soils it is better to plant them on the level, as they stand the winter better. A con- venient mode for earthing up is to plant them in four-feet beds, six rows in a bed, the plant six inches apart. Peas.—To get good late crops it is advisable to sow in well-manured trenches six inches below the general level, as in case of drought the trenches can be filled with water quickly, and will keep all that is given them. The principal enemy of late-sown peas is mildew, the result of a starved condition of the plants. Peas advancing in gro wth should be staken in good time; if they once fall over, they can never be got up again to do as well as they should. Watering peas, as a rule, is objectionable, and if they are on ground deeply dug and liberally manured-and it is mere vexation to attempt to grow peas on poor ground, or ground badly prepared—they will not want water. Turnips must be sown now, as there will be a demand for them soon. Use abundance of manure sow if possible just before rain occurs, or between flying showers. Endive to be sown on rich soil, and early sown to be Planted out. Cucumbers in frames often show a stubbornness m swelling off their fruit, though apparently full of health and vigour. Very often a good soaking at the root will cure all this. Cucumber plants may be and often are kept alive by the syringe merely, but they want soaking to be fruitful. Where the plants are still Pushing, and are full of vigour, put on about two inches of fresh soil. In the case of cucumbers that have grown large, and there is likelihood of waste, half a fruit may be cut, and the other half be left on the vine. The half left will continue to grow, and may be cut when wanted. This is a better way than wasting half a cucumber. Winter Greens to be got out in plenty now, as peas, potatoes, and other crops are taken off. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and other quick-growing subjects that will mostly be used before Christmas, to be planted in manured ground but those to stand till next spring, to furnish sprouts, not to be manured, as it renders them less able to withstand severe frosts. Continue to plant broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Scotch kale, and everything else of the kind from the seed-beds. Hardy Bulbs, such as hyacinths, tulips, snowdrops, crocuses, &c., may be taken up and stored away. ( Where planted in a mixed arrangement, and 'the I Vound need not be disturbed, it is a good plan to allow all these bulbs to remain two or three years in the ground. Asters and Stocks to be planted out from pots and seed-pans during moist weather. Dahlias to be staked at once, if not already attended to, and the forwardest shoots to be carefully tied. Roses are in most districts infested by grub or fly. Heavy rains will do them more good than any kind of artificial watering. The removal of the grubs that curl the leaves and gnaw out the hearts of the buds is usually accomplished by hand-picking—that is, when accomplished at all; and it is such a tedious job, that nine-tenths of all the rose-growers leave the trees to fight it out. Probably the Aphis-wash of the City Soap Company, which is so immediately effectual in the destruction of fly, would be equally destructive of these grubs. We advise rosarians to give it a fair trial. Pot roses must have abundance of water now. Chrysanthemums must be made to grow freely now, or it is impossible they should bloom well. Give abundance of water. Where quantities are required for plunging or other rough purposes, it is a good plan to plant them out on an open sunny spot, and take them up early in October, and pot them for flowering. But genuine specimens cannot be obtained in this way: they must be grown in pots from the first. Chrysanthemums in the open ground to be topped again, and the soil between them lightly pricked over with a small fork, and some quite rotten dung worked in. It will be found that they always root near the surface, and a dressing of dung will greatly help them, and save the labour of watering. Calla Æthiopica is an aquatic, but is usually grown as if it was unacquainted with water. We shall see everywhere, now especially, in nurseries and great gardens the plants standing on coal-ashes, and getting a daily drop of water in common with other things. By this treatment they flower once a year. We have some that were potted on in very rich unctuous loam, after their spring flowering was over, and then plunged in water, one inch deep, out of doors. They have grown prodigiously, and are now flowering profusely. Agapanthus to have abundance of water while throw- ing up flower-spikes, and until the bloom is over then to be shaken out and parted, and the strongest crowns selected for next year's bloom. Pot these singly in small pots, removing with a sharp knife any of the straggling roots that cannot be got into the pots. The soil should be sandy loam, rotten dung, and peat, equal quantities. Shut them up, and re-shift as soon as the pots are full of roots. The small offsets and the fleshy roots may be used for increase of stock. Plant in shallow pans of sandy peat, and place in a gentle bottom-heat for a fortnight; then separate them, and pot singly in sixties. Bedding Geraniums should be propagated at once for next year, and the best way is to use cuttings only two or three joints in length, and pot them singly in 60-sized pots. By being struck early, there is time for the plants to make ripe wood before winter, and in- stead of waiting till July for bloom, they will, if well managed, be in full bloom in. May next, when first planted out. Tall-growing bedders need a little care now to protect them from high winds. A very effectual and expedi- tious method is to insert strong stakes, and run a few lengths of stout tarred string amongst them, so as to form a support to the back and front of every row. Small forked branches will serve the same purpose where the plants are not sufficiently regular to be sup- ported with string. Camellias showing their flower-buds at the points of the new shoots should have more air and less water. The syringe need not be used any more upon them, but they ought never to go dry at the root, for that is a sure way to cause the buds to fall. Pelargoniums as they go out of bloom to be cut down, and placed in a warm, sheltered, and rather shady place for a week, then to be put in the full sun and kept rather dry at the root, with occasional sprinklings of the stems and leaves till they break, and then to be repotted back into small pots with sound lumpy turf to make their new roots in. Cinerarias coming up in seed-pans to be pricked out as soon as large enough to lift, and have separate thumb-pots, with light rich compost, and be put in a frame to grow on. By securing a vigorous growth from the first, they will be less troubled with fly, and make fine specimens. Those who have not sown seed yet must do so at once, or it will be too late. Hard-wooded plants requiring a shift this season must have it at once, or the time will go by for them to derive full benefit from the operation. The most important matter of all is to secure good drainage and to use the compost in as rough a state as possible con- sistent with the size and nature of the plant. When- ever the cultivator is in doubt about the best soil for any hard-wooded plant, he will be pretty safe in using half peat and half loam, both in a turfy and sweet con- dition—the more elastic the better. Fuschias must be syringed twice a day, and have moderate shade. Fine plants in comparatively small pots will be greatly benefited with weak liquid manure every three or four days. They should be propagated now in quantity for next year's supply. The smallest cuttings make the best plants, and there is no need to cut to a joint. A mild bottom-heat will hasten the for- mation of roots, but it is not needful, as if shut up in a cold frame, and shaded and regularly kept sprinkled, they will be well rooted in a fortnight. It is a saving of time in the end to put all cuttings singly in pots at this time of year, as they can be allowed to fill the first pots with roots, so as to grow strong from the first start. In preparing pots for the cuttings, use smallest sixties or thumbs put a mixture of turf and old dung over the crocks, and fill up with half sand and half leaf, in which the cuttings will root as quickly as in sand alone at this season, and have something to live upon while filling the pots with roots. This is the best method for amateurs who are much away from home, as the single cuttings require less care than when dibbled into sand only in shallow pans. 7

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