Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

THE SLADE BARONETCY CASE.

A TRIUMPHANT DOG!

HOW INSURANCE COMPANIES ARE…

AN UNSUITABLE MARRIAGE.

ALMOST INCREDIBLE!I

THE FENIAN RIOT AT WATERFORD.

News
Cite
Share

THE FENIAN RIOT AT WATERFORD. Of the four prisoners (arrested at Dungarvan a fort- night ago), whose removal to Waterford caused so serious and fatal a riot, two only (says the correspon- dent of the Pall Mall Gazette), were persons of any note. These two, undoubtedly of the party who landed mys- teriously near Dungarvan, are General William Nagle, of the United States army, formerly of the 88th New York Regiment, and Captain Warren, of the 63rd New York Volunteers. It is stated that both were well-known citizens of New York, and persons of con- sideration there. Nagle is a lawyer, who studied his profession under Mr. Seward and Warren had at one time a connection with the press. These prisoners were arrested in Cork, and the motive of lodging them temporarily in the gaol at Waterford, on their way to Dublin, does not appear. The Waterford populace 7d were disturbed from the day of the arrival of Corydon, and, it being known-that the prisoners were coming by the train, a large crowd met the police and their charge at the railway station at nine o'clock at night. On their way to the gaol the police were pelted with large stones, especially at the hill of Ballybricken, which is a usual centre for the assembling of mobs. The constables, however, without sustaining much in- jury, were enabled to place their prisoners in gaol, and it was as they returned that the serious affray arose. The police, reinforced by the local body, numbered forty-two, and the mounted portion, galloping round the foet constables, managed for atimeto,bepoff the mob. Stones and brickbats, however, of the largest size were thrown some from behind the wall of St. Patrick's churchyard, and many of the police were struck the swords of some were broken, and others received wounds in the head. It was when things had reached this pitch that one of the constables was seized by the crowd, detached from his companions, and roughly handled. The police immediately charged for his rescue, using their bayo- nets freely, and recovering him wounded and bleed- ing. The crowd had got into a street having no open- ing at the end, and here Walsh, a salter by trade, who immediately died, was stabbed. Keenan, a tinsmith, also received a bayonet thrust, which proved fatal in some hours. It is stated that in the early part of the riot the Fenian prisoners begged the people to desist, in vain. During the uproar cheers were given for the Irish Republic. A later despatch says Walsh must have died instantaneously. The sword-bayonet entered the right side and pierced the heart. Another man, named Kinahan, is in hospital not likely to recover. He is wounded in the back. Altogether thirty-two of the Eolice were injured by stones, and have cuts in the ead or about the body more or less serious. Previous to the appearance of the escort with the prisoners, women had collected heaps of stones at various points, and they ran about frantically, supplying them from their aprons to those who threw them." A telegram from Dublin says that the funeral of the man Walsh was attended by 5,000 people, who walked in procession, contrary to the advice of the Roman Catholic bishop. The hearse was decorated with green branches and flowers, and hundreds bore branches in their hands. The coffin was carried after the hearse by six men. All passed off quietly.

AN ASTOUNDING CONJUROR!

SCIENTIFIC COURTSHIP.

ROMAN CATHOLIC PASTOKALS.

CRUELTY TO CALVES.

THE TRIALS OF ROYALTY!

SHOCKING MURDER OF A WOMAN…

SERIOUS DISTURBANCES IN BIRMINGHAM.

QUERY.I

The PRESENT ASPECT of the…

A REMARKABLE DWARF.

.A ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP AND…