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-----THE IRISH FISHERIES.…

DUTY OF VOLUNTEERS IN TIMES…

.A YANKEE STORY.

SCOTTISH ANECDOTES.

A CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE. , --

PIT ACCIDENTS.

IA NOVEL STRIKE.

THE WORKING MEN AT THE PARIS…

THE GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTISANS.

CAVALRY CHA BGE S.

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CAVALRY CHA BGE S. The following is from a book t- ui) d The History of Lord Seaton's Regiment," by liev Wdham Leeke, M.A. I have a very vivid reoollection the charge of the French cavalry. Those who adw ced on the right square of the 52nd were cuirassiers having iioi, only a steel breastplate but the same covering for the back. As I observed before, the pleasing part of the charge was that, for several minutes, perhaps ten, we were relieved from the cannona le w H ch the French had kept up upon us, except when t.hei'- cavalry charged. They came on in very gallant style, and in very steady order, first of all at a trot, then at :i gallop, till they were within forty or fifty yards of the front face of the square, when one or two horses having been brought down, in clearing the obstacle they got a somewhat new direction, which carried them to either flank of the face of the square, which direedon they one and all preferred to the charging home and riding on to our bayonets. Notwithstanding their armour, many of the men were laid low, many horses dso were brought down, and the men had a difficulty in disentangling themselves from them. The cuirassiers passed' the square, receiving the fire of all the four faces, and pro- ceeded up to the crest of the British position. They then re-formed, and came down the slope again upon us in the same way, and again avoiding to charge home upon the rear face of the square, as they could scarcely hope to penetrate the squares possibly it was a reconnoisance ordered to be made by the Emperor, who had no other means of ascertaining what force the Duke of Wellington had at that time on the reverse slope of the position. From the French position scarcely any of the British troops could at that time be seen, except our own and the other regiments of General Adam's brigade. An interesting anecdote was mentioned to me not long ago, by the late Gene- ral Sir Frederick Love, who was a captain and brevet-major in the 52nd at Waterloo Some years ago he and his brother were returning through the south of France, from a trip they had been taking to the Pyrenees, when they fell in with a nice gentle- manly Frenchman in one of the public conveyances, who, in the course of conversation, told them that he also had served at Waterloo and it turned out, on their comparing notes, that he had been an officer of some standing in the very regiment of cuirassiers which had charged the right square of the 52nd in that action. Amongst other things, the French officer said that whilst the cuirassiers were re-forming, just under the British position, preparatory to renewing their attack upon us, he observed that the men had ordered their arms and were standing at ease, and that he said to a young officer near him, "See how coolly those fellows take it; depend upon it that is one of the old Spanish regiments, and we shall make no impression on them." This officer added, that on charging back again he rode close to the right face of our square, so close that a young fellow sprang from the square and wounded him with his bayonet on the left side of his neck it was a slight wound, but he showed them the scar which it had left. My attention, when the cuirassiers charged back upon us, was chiefly directed to those who were brought down by our fire, about twenty yards from the angle formed by the front and right faces but I have a recollection of something having occurred at that time, without knowing what it was, in the front ranks of the right face of the square, not far from its junction with the rear face.

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A CAUTION TO YOUNG LATd