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-----THE IRISH FISHERIES.…

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THE IRISH FISHERIES. The Deep Sea and Coast Fishery Commissioners, Ireland, to their report for 1866, issued on Saturday, state ;— The quantity of herrings taken on the eastern coast has been considerably in excess of what it was in 1865, but nevertheless it has not been so profitable, nor yielded such good returns to the fishermen and owners of boats, in consequences of:. the low prices generally obtained. On the south coast, the excessive Severity of the season has most injuriously affected the mackerel fishing, the approach of the shoals to the bank having been apparently retarded thereby but recently they have appeared in their wonted numbers, lr giving a vast amount of lucrative employment to the large number of fine boats and their crews congregated on that coast, and to the other persons engaged in the business. On the western coast there appears on the whole to be but little change in the condition and Prospects of the fisheries from the previous year. Except in the few sheltered places, such as Galway and Dingle Bays, the interruptions from the stormy Weather which prevails so frequently and for such long- continued periods along the rugged coast, prevent almost the possibility of fishing being pursued as a regular avocation. Moreover, it appears to us to be a matter of serious doubt whether the superabun- dance of fish, which it.is the general belief there is off that coast, in reality exists. With regard to the oyster fisheries, we trust that, at least, there has been no further deterioration as compared with last year, and that the exhaustion of the public beds has been in Some measure arrested. The stormy weather which has prevailed throughout the season has greatly re- stricted the operations of the dredgers their take has been comparatively small. A considerable number of new licenses to form private beds have been granted by us during the year. No complaints have reached us from any quarter in regard to the conduct of the fisher- men; they have been everywhere, peaceable, and we are happy to find that the old antagonism which existed between the trawlers and the Claddagh men in Galway •^ay, has, at all events for the present, disappeared, and that the latter are now not unfrequently employed 111 the trawl boats. 0,

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A CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE. , --

PIT ACCIDENTS.

IA NOVEL STRIKE.

THE WORKING MEN AT THE PARIS…

THE GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTISANS.

CAVALRY CHA BGE S.

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A CAUTION TO YOUNG LATd