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SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO BECOME…

FACTS ABOUT THE NEGRO.

DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

PAST AND PRESENT TIMES.

RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR.

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AT THE…

A PANEGYRIC ON THE POPE.

THE CONVEYANCE OF CATTLE,…

A RAILWAY CASE.

LUGGAGE ON RAILWAY CARRIAGES.

HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION.

NOTES ABOUT HIGHWAYMEN.

THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA.

THE POLISH AMNESTY.

BANNS OF MARRIAGE.

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BANNS OF MARRIAGE. In the Lower House of Convocation, Sir George Prevost presented the report of a committee on the subject of banns of marriage. The report entered at length into the history of banns, and stated that the practice was of very great antiquity, and was universal, at least in the Western Church. The canons enjoining thrice-repeated pub- lication of banns were made in England in the reigns of King John in 1200, of Edward II. and Edward III. in 1322 and 1328. The report reviewed the condition of the law, and the committee expressed the opinion "that the state of the law in this matter appeared to them to be very defective and unsatisfactory," en- cluraging, as it had been said, evasion, deceit, and fraud, inasmuch as Sir George Prevost explained, the clergyman was not authorised to ask any questions of the persons seeking to be married, and if a man or woman made any false statement they are not punish- able but if they made such false statement on being mar- ried before the registrar, there was a liability of being punished. The principal suggestions made by the committee were, that in any alteration of the law the rubrics relative to the publication of banns should remain unaltered that the banns be published after the Nicene Creed in the morning service of Sunday, or, where there is no such morning service, that they shall be published in the evening service, at the end of the prayers; and that no clergyman should publish the banns of any persons until they delivered to him a notice stating what the persons were, where they lived, a declaration that neither was a minor, and that there was no impediment to such marriage; that these particulars shall be given in and signed by one of the persons desiring to marry; that if any person desire to avoid the public asking of banns in service time that the clergyman may at their desire enter a notice in a book, which any person may be allowed to examine, and.tliat, after the expiration of twenty-one days, the persons desiring to be married may have a certificate, if no impediment to the marriage be known to the clergyman, and on the production of this certificate the persons may be married in the church named m the notice that any person making a false declaration shall be liable to suffer the penalt.es of perjury that the fees be of one uniform rate, and that those for mar- riages at church and those at registrar's offices shall be as nearly as possible equalised. These are the chief suggestions, and Sir G. Prevost moved a resolution for the general approval of the re- port. A very long discussion, mostly upon technical points, ensued, and it was explained that the scheme here pro- proed only gave church people the same privileges as disenters had, and which church people might have by leaving the church. Archdeacon Denison expressed his general dissent with the proposal to give persons the power to avoid banns. To do this, was to administer to a morbid feeling. The higher classes, he said, who used formerly to be married by licence, were now generally mar- ried by banns, and this practice ought to be en- couraged. Sir Henry Thompson advocated the principle of cheap licences so that persons might obtain from the clergyman a licence on the Friday, and be married on the followin Sunday. Dr. Williams supported this advocacy, and said that such a law would enable persons -in the position of mariners to be married without haying to wait, as now, for a considerable time while the banns were- being published. Mr. Horner objected to a part of the report, which laid, down that persons who desired to be married should be three weeks residents of the parish which they proposed being married. The debate was adjourned till Friday, when the subject was resumed by Sir George Prevost moving the following "suggestion" of the committee on this subject:—" That, if any person intending to marry wish to avoid the public asking of the banns in service time, the clergyman of the parish shall, at their desire, enter a notice'[according to a form given] (to be signed by the persons intending marriage, and by a churchwarden of the parish or parishes in which they severally dwell, or by two householders known to the clergyman, and by whom one at least of the persons intending marriage is known, dating such notice on the day on which it is. entered) in a book to be kept for the purpose by him, or by such person as he may appoint, which book any person on application may be allowed to- examine; and that, after the expiration of twenty-one days from the date thereof, if no impediment be alleged or be in any way known to the clergyman, he shall on applica- tion deliver unto one of the said persons a certificate, and, on production of such certificate, the persons in- tending marriage shall be entitled to have their mar- riages solemnised in the church named in the notice, being the parish church of one of the persons intending marriage." The resolution was carried. Sir George Prevost proposed the next suggestion, which was that persons wilfully making or signing a declaration containing a false statement should be liable to suffer the penalties of perjury. This was agreed to, as was another providing that in the case of a minor a certificate must be delivered to- the clergyman showing the consent of the father, guardian, or lawful mother, before such minor can be married. The next suggestions, which were also carried, were that persons who had obtained the right in one church to be married might be married in any church of the diocese, that the fees should be of one uniform rate, and the fees of the Church as nearly as possible equalised with those of the registrar's office, and that marriages must be solemnised within three months after the publication of banns or the entry in the church book. The House then went back to the first suggestion, which was left over,, namely, That in any alteration of the law the duly authorised rubrics in the book of common prayer relating to the publica- tion of banns remain unaltered." This was struck out, and the second suggestion was prefaced by the words, "That in accordance with the rubric in the sealed book, banns be published," &c. It was then formally carried that these suggestions should be frai. ed into a representation to be taken to the Upper House.

ITEACHING SAVAGES TO SING.

A PLEASANT PROSPECT.

THR DANGERS OF, TIGER SHOOTING.