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SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO BECOME…

FACTS ABOUT THE NEGRO.

DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

PAST AND PRESENT TIMES.

RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR.

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AT THE…

A PANEGYRIC ON THE POPE.

THE CONVEYANCE OF CATTLE,…

A RAILWAY CASE.

LUGGAGE ON RAILWAY CARRIAGES.

HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION.

NOTES ABOUT HIGHWAYMEN.

THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA.

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THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA. The Viscount Pollington, in "Half Round the Old World," gives the following description of the Crown Jewels of Persia:— It would be endless and impossible, to describe a tithe of them, or even the impressions they produced on our eyes. Their value, putting a moderate estimate on them, could not, in our own judgment, and that of the four gentlemen who saw them with us, by any pos- sibility be under forty or fifty millions of money; that is if they were to be sold singly. Of course, in the ag- gregate, no fortune would suffice to pay for them, and, therefore, their value would be depreciated. We must attempt to describe a few in the order they were shown to us. An evidently French jewel case was brought in first, and placed on a table, round which we eagerly gathered awaiting its opening. In this there were some forty gold, rings, each with a single diamond, of which the largest (diamond, not ring) was some one-and-a-half inch ."g round, and the smallest a quarter of an inch. One with a large yellow diamond. Two diamonds were placed as pendants at the end of a necklace of pearls, and most gracefully, looking like two drops of dew. Two pearl necklaces, each pearl perfectly round and white, and about the size of a large pea. In two little drawers two or three more necklaces, the pearls this time much larger; and in the bottom drawer another, of the largest pearls we had yet seen, arranged-an oblong one, and a perfectly round one alternately, each, with- out the smallest exaggeration, being the size of a sour cherry. This casket always follows the Shah wherever he goes next came a collection of a dozen belts, each surpassing the other in costliness and taste. One of these had the fastening buckle, about eight inches long and three broad, studded with perfect rubies, each about half an inch round, set in gold. Another, diamonds only; a third, the whole band set in emeralds and diamonds, and so on. We then were shown four sabres; all had the flat side of the scabbard richly enamelled on gold one was one blaze of dia- monds on the hilt and scabbard; another was studded with pearls like large peas a third was set with dia- monds and other stones to represent flowers. Two other necklaces we were shown were about two-and-a- half feet long each, and formed of large emeralds, each about an inch and a quarter long, alternating with bunches of pearls. An aigrette presented by some emperor of Austria was exquisitely worked as a bouquet of. flowers, in diamonds, with one large amethyst, set a jour. The last tray of jewels was the "bonne bouche." On this we saw a belt of pliant gold work, the buckle consisting of the- celebrated Deriehnoor," or sea of light," a diamond perfectly flat, except at the edges, and almost two inches long by one-and-a-quarter in breadth (?); it was set round with other smaller diamonds with this there were some bracelets of uncut rubies and emeralds, quite as large as pigeons' eggs for the most part. The largest turquoise we saw was perfectly flat, and about .one inch by ashalf. ;;Two beautiful amethysts in silver settings. We saw One of the Royal crowns the other is keptcinthe inner treasury in the Harem, which is only opened once a year on the top of this is the famous ruby that belonged at one time to Aurungzebe, a good deal larger than a pigeon's egg and uncut. The aigrette in front, something in the style of the Prince of Wales' Feathers, is of diamonds (the largest is set as a pendant, alone ;) between this and the red velvet cap of the crown there is a plume of spun glass such as. may be bought for the sum of one penny at the Polytechnic. A black velvet robe with diamond but- tons and frogs looked lugubrious but priceless others, with the collar and sleeves completely covered with large pearls, were amongst some of the various things we saw.

THE POLISH AMNESTY.

BANNS OF MARRIAGE.

ITEACHING SAVAGES TO SING.

A PLEASANT PROSPECT.

THR DANGERS OF, TIGER SHOOTING.