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SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO BECOME…

FACTS ABOUT THE NEGRO.

DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

PAST AND PRESENT TIMES.

RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR.

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AT THE…

A PANEGYRIC ON THE POPE.

THE CONVEYANCE OF CATTLE,…

A RAILWAY CASE.

LUGGAGE ON RAILWAY CARRIAGES.

HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION.

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HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION. The following well-told little sketch is from Frasers' Magcizine, At the earnest request of Mr. Wilberforce, she set up a school in her parish, and at once became a mark for the determined and insolent hostility of the farmers and the smaller gentry. She and her sister were mobbed by angry agriculturists, who wished to know what the ladies meant by turning their labourers into Jacobins. In vain the poor women protested that all they aimed at was to enable the girls to sew and cook and read their Bibles. In vain they disclaimed the monstrous charge of teaching the children of peasants to write and cipher. Mrs. Hannah More has em- bodied her sorrows in one of her admirable tracts. She tells us how good Mrs. Jones resolved to set up a Sunday school, and called upon the neighbours to raise funds for its support. When she came to Farmer Hoskins, she told him that as he was the richest farmer in the parish she.looked to him for a handsome sub- scription. Subscription said he, it's nothing.but subscriptions, I think. A man had need to be made of money. Well, madam, what is the sub- scription now?" "I am going to establish a Sunday school, farmer and I come to you as one of the principal inhabitants of the parish, hoping your example will spur on the rest to give." "Why, then," said the farmer, as one of the prin- cipal inhabitants in the parish, I will give nothing hoping that my example will spur on the rest to refuse. Of all the foolish inventions and new-fangled devices to ruin the country, that of teaching the poor to read is the very worst." "And I, farmer, think that to teach good principles to the poor is the most likely way to save the country. Now, in order to do this, we must teach them to read." Not with my consent or money," said the farmer; "for I know italways does them more harm than good." But Mrs. Jones, who evidently knew the way to the heart of Mr. Hos- kins, took pains to let him know that all the genteel and wealthy people had subscribed; so, at last he said, Why, as to the matter of that, I do not value a crown: only I think it might be better bestowed. And I am afraid my own workmen will fly in my face if once they are made scholars and that they will''think themselves too good to work. But, to please you, if you do not think that religion will spoil my young servants, I do not care if you do put me down for half-a-guinea. What has Farmer Dobson given?" 1' Half-a-guinea," said Mrs. Jones. Well," said the farmer "it shall neVer be said that I do not give more than he. Put me down for a guinea. Scarce as guineas are now, I'll never be put on the same footing with Dobson, neither."

NOTES ABOUT HIGHWAYMEN.

THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA.

THE POLISH AMNESTY.

BANNS OF MARRIAGE.

ITEACHING SAVAGES TO SING.

A PLEASANT PROSPECT.

THR DANGERS OF, TIGER SHOOTING.