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SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO BECOME…

FACTS ABOUT THE NEGRO.

DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

PAST AND PRESENT TIMES.

RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR.

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RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR. The Army Transport Committee, over which Lord Strathnairn presided, had to consider the subject of railway transport, and in their report, dated in March last, they state the chief arrangements which would be made for the organization of this branch of the service. They consider that the introduction of rail- way conveyance nted not Complicate the question of ordinary military transport. Railway transport re- quires an organization of its own. While the railway affords facilities, it greatly adds to the casualties and risks attending the supply of troops, not only from the chance of interruption and damage to the permanent way by the enemy, but also from the difficulty of keeping up transport communication between the rail- way line and the forces to be supplied. Lieutenant-Colonel Reilly, R. A.In a memo- randum on Prussian transport, remarks that it requires little to stop a railway or disarrange .the traffic if the enemy is enterprising and the population hostile; in the late German campaign the Laudwehr had to supply- strong guards along the line, and at the principal stations, and at each of the principal stations a staff officer was in charge. With all their advantages the commissariat did not succeed in feeding the soldiers as we should require it to do, and Lieutenant-Colonel Reilly was informed by a surgeon that the men of his division were many days without animal food, and from the day before until the day after Koniggratz the whole army was without rations but this partial failure was owing to the parsimony of the Govern- ment inducing the people to drive their herds into the woods. Lord Strathnairn observes t' "t though the Prussian armies moved to within sig'. of Vienna mainly by railroad, and without a great proportion of army transport, it must be recollected that this was done after great successes, and with a thorough knowledge of the depressed morale of their antagonist, which made that forward movement safe. The only occasion, he says, on which railway transport supersedes army or animal transport is when the country concerned is completely in possession of an army, as, for instance, before Sebastopol; but even there the ammunition and supplies had to be conveyed from the terminus by animal transport or hand to the troops, and of course animal transport would have been indispensable for a forward movement, which could not have been avoided if the Russians had not evacuated Sebastopol, or if the base of operations had been transferred (as was con- templated) from the Crimea to Mingrelia or Georgia. No General in the field which he is disputing with an enemy is justified in diminishing the amount of animal transport, because he has the assistance, which is purely partial, of rail, any more than he would had he the use, also purely partial, of sea or inland water transport. Captain H. W. Gordon, principal superintendent T>f stores at Woolwich, stated also in his evidence before the Committee that he cannot send a 9-ton gun to Portsmouth by rail, although the railway comes into the arsenal; the permanent way, he believes, is .not sufficiently strong, and there is no truck that can take the gun.

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AT THE…

A PANEGYRIC ON THE POPE.

THE CONVEYANCE OF CATTLE,…

A RAILWAY CASE.

LUGGAGE ON RAILWAY CARRIAGES.

HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION.

NOTES ABOUT HIGHWAYMEN.

THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA.

THE POLISH AMNESTY.

BANNS OF MARRIAGE.

ITEACHING SAVAGES TO SING.

A PLEASANT PROSPECT.

THR DANGERS OF, TIGER SHOOTING.