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------THE CORONATION OF THE…

STARVING A CHILD TO DEATH.

AN EXCITING SCENE AT A FIRE.

MOURNFUL INCIDENT AT A ROYAL…

THE INTENTIONS OF THE FENIANS…

THE FLOGGINGS IN JAMAICA.

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THE FLOGGINGS IN JAMAICA. Some Further Correspondence relative to the Af- fairs of Jamaica," just published, gives the depositions of a number of women (and some men) who were fl, igged without trial after the rebellion, together with the evidence of witnesses who saw the treatment they received. In the case of a charge of flogging against Mr. Christopher Codrington, a justice of the peace, Elizabeth Collins said:- I live at Long Bay, on my own place, which I work. The same Friday in December last year that defendant flogged my daughter, Charlotte Scott, I was taken before him to Meiu's shop at Long Bay, in this parish, by one Michael Pearcey. a constable. Mary Johnston was taken with me. Defendant asked Mary Johnston, "Did you not hear Mrs. Collins wanted to catch one of my barrows in the place of one of her hogs I poisoned ? Mary told him, No and he swore her on a liible, and she still said" No." He then said to her, You see that cocoa-nut tree? that woman (meaning me) is to be tied to it and get some lashes, and if you refuse to tell me what that woman said you will get the same." Then Mary said, Yes, she did hear me say I would catch one of his hogs." He ordered Pearcey to put me up into a room. Pearcey did so, and awhile after brought me out and then defendant ordered James McComock Reid to tie me to a cocoa-nut tree. Reid tied my hands and feet to the cocoa-nut tree and pulled down my clothes to my waist, and defendant ordered him to give me thirty lashes, which Reid did, with a cat, on my shoulders. I bled much, and was sick two weeks. I have the marks still. Mr. Christopher Codrington and Mr. Mein were present when I was flogged. Before martial law defendant poisoned a hog of mine, but I never said that I would take one of his in payment. The man who administered the flogging, James McComock Reid, said During martial law I flogged Elizabeth Collins with a cat on her W-tked shoulders, at Long Bay. She was tied hands and feet to a cocoa-nut tree. I gave her more than twenty blows. The cat was made of black fishing lines. I did this by Mr. Christopher Codrington's orders. He was present and saw me do it. The woman's back bled. Mr. David Mein was on the left hand, with a sword. Mr. James Codrington, who, it is pointed out, had not even the questionable justification of being a magistrate for ordering flogging, appears to have resorted to that mode of punishment upon very slight provocation. One Ann Galloway gave the following evidence against him :— On Wednesday, the 18th day of October last yeat, I was taken by Charles Hunter before defendant at Long Bay, in this parish, and he ordered Daniel Biggerstaff to give me thirty-five lashes. He did not try me or examine me at all Defendant made Biggerstaff drop my clothes, and made me naked to the waist, and he told Biggerstaff to tie me to a wain wheel, and he did so, and defendant told Biggerstaff to flog me, and Biggerstaff did so on my bare shoulders with a guava stick defendant was standing by. My back bled, and defendant washed it with salt pickle it burned me. I was in the family way," and I was sick for two months and two weeks after the flogging In reference to these and similar cases the Earl of Carnarvon writes to Sir Peter Grant, under date of Jan 31,1867, that he has read the depositions "with the deepest regret, both at the unwarranted acts of cruelty which, upon the face of the depositions, ap- pear to have been committed by some of the parties accused, and at. the evidence which those papers con- tain of the political prepossessions by which unhappily the grand jurors have allowed their minds to be in- fluenced in the discharge of their judicial duties." As there is nothing, however, in Sir Peter Grant's latest despatch to lea< to the hope that a better feeling existed among the class from which grand jurors would be selected, his lordship refrains from instructing the Governor to take any further step for the prosecution of the accused. "At the same time," he adds, "if the local feeling has undergone any change, or if any- thing has occurred which in your judgment makes it more probable that a fair and impartial investigation could be obtained in the cases of these persons, you are of course at liberty to proceed."

FOOD AND DRESS IN PARIS. --

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ROMANTIC IF TRUE.