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JlUtarpfltitan QfJDsaip

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JlUtarpfltitan QfJDsaip BY OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. [The ranark3 under this head are to be regarded as the ampress.Oil of independent opinion, from the pen of a gentle- man ir. whom we have the greatest confidence, but for wlucJ* We nevertheless do not hold ourselves responsible-I This week the intelligence received from abroad certainly throws all home news into the shade. First, there was the telegram which announced that the Archduchess Matilda of Austria, had succumbed to her injuries. It is the old, old story, which has told of devastation in many a family, gentle and humble ere this time, but which has never hitherto been narrated of royalty. The sudden treading upon a iucifer, the quick-springing flames, the agonised ihrieks, and the slow and lingering death. By this awfully sudden fate a fair young girl has perished, another blow has fallen upon the already down-trodden jlionse of Hapsburg, the splendour of the Hungarian ,Coronation has been dimmed, and the young prince of Italy has lost a bride. But while the public mind was illed with sympathy for this catastrophe, the feeling Was changed to indignation when the telegraph flashed jtoross the intelligence of the dastardly attempt to assassinate the Czar in the streets of Paris. Even now, people have not done talking of it, and the papers still are full of it. All unite in condemning the attempt, and the press is unanimous in its denuncia- tion of the would-be assassin. The French press is particularly vigorous in its language. The CcmBtitu- tionnel "writes under painful and profound emotion.' ') The Siede looks upon the attempt with horror,' while the Union views it with "profound sadness," and the others indulge in didactic leaders on the topic The Pays, however, steers a course of its own, and scolds the French people vigorously. Our neighbours over the Water are more vivacious, even in their writing, than theirmore solid British neighbours, but although calmly Written and not expressive of horror," or sadness, the leaders of the great daily papers have been no less forcible, and all in uniting to condemn such an outrage against humanity, only express what is the feeling of the whole )f civilised Europe. Europe ean by this time boast another King. Francis Joseph of Austria has been reconciled to his Magyar subjects, and for the first time in thirty years the iron crown of Hungary has rested on the brow of a son of Haps- Irurg. Hungary is now, or ought to be, the great Jiope of the Austrian Empire, and the King will do well to please his Magyar people. He has begun well Jay remitting nearly five hundred sentences for political offences. It is the interest also of the Hungarians to ftudy war and politics less, and peace and commerce more. For many years the position of Francis Joseph will not be an easy one, but if he acquits himself well he will more than retrieve his expulsion from Germany and the disasters of Sadowa and Koniggratz. It seems that after all everybody has been nicely "sold" with regard to her Majesty's intention to build a Convalescent Home at her own ex- pense. Several papers have stated that they are authorised to contradict the report, and the Lancet endeavours to show whence the rumour arose. It says that the governors of St. Bartholomew's Hospital have for some time intended to build a home for their convalescent patients, that some benevolent person has promised to contribute liberally towards it, and that her Majesty will most likely be pleased to call it after her own name or confer the title of royal" upon it. If this be the true programme, the benevolent person (by whom I imagine Miss Bur- dett Coutts is meant) will have the onus of the matter to bear, and the Queen's share in it will be very small indeed. It must be awkward, even for royal person- ages, to be lauded to the skies for good deeds which they never meant to perform. The mountain has been in labour, and has brought forth a mouse." A discussion took place in Parliament last week upon the very queer subject of tattooing midshipmen's noses. It appears that two midshipmen were dis. missed from the Phcebe for cutting the broad arrow upon the nose of a newly-arrived comrade. The Daily Telegraph, which has7 a penchant for taking up odd matters, got wind of it, and published an account of it. There are always members anxious to redress grievances, and the matter was that same night brought before the House. The Admiralty gave an explanation, stating that the offenders had been dis- missed, but declining further information. One gen- tleman thereupon got to his feet and declared it a shame that midshipmen should be dismissed for carry- ing out a time-honoured custom of Her Majesty's Navy. Next morning the Telegraph, was, of course,. txtremely anxious to know how many more" time- lonoured customs" of the sort prevailed in the navy. The words of the champion of the youthful torturers leem, however, to have carried weight, for it was an- lounced on a subsequent evening that they had been reinstated. So much for the ceremonies of initiation aito our naval service There always have been, and there always will be, croakers and prophets of evil. Among them one of the medical publications may this week be classed. NVe. are informed in its columns that its conductors always Watch the progress of the Mecca pilgrims with anxious eyes. This year they have been at their accustomed task, straining their vision towards the holy place to see whether cholera would break out among the filthy fanatics who crowd to it. They are pleased to inform us that although cleanliness seems to have no place in the Mahommedan creed, not one- of the hordes of pilgrims has fallen a victim to the dread pestilence, so that he will not come stalking with giant strides from Mecca to London. Unfortunately, we have a certain class of the population living in the lanea and alleys of the City who are as filthy as any pilgrims who ever visited a shrine, and letters which appeared lately tell us that in many places no steps have as yet been taken to improve their sanitary ar- rangements during the warm weather. What if we breed the dread visitor here, and let him loose on Mecca ? One of the pleasantest of the' London anniversaries took place towards the close of last week in the an- nual gathering of the Charity School children at St. Paul's. Upwards of four thousand children attended, and the bright facings of the girls' uniforms, and their quaint little mob caps mingling tastefully with the darker clothing of the boys', gave the assemblage quite a brilliant appearance. It brings the freshness back to one's heart to step into St. Paul's on this fes- tival day, and see so many innocent little faces, and hear so many little voices chanting praise in the grand old cathedral—and it makes one all the more happy when he thinks that these children are saved by the chanty of the age from becoming waifs and strays, broken down by misery and stained by crime. So many people seemed to feel it, for not fewer than ten thousand persons assembled in St. Paul's last week. It appears that in London there are two great armies which are constantly at war. These are the police and the thieves. Last week the thieves had decidedly the advantage. It appears that the com- mander of the City Militia chose to march his men through the City without first giving notice at Scot- land Yard. The predatory classes somehow became informed of his neglect, and mustered in strong force. They posted themselves at the corners of streets in the line of march, and as respectable passers-by cazae F "!i1!I along attacked them in bodies and despoiled them 01 their valuables. Sometimes a dozen of people were thus knocked down and robbed at one time. The police did their best, but they were only a handful against so many. They succeeded, however, in cap- turing fifteen of the rascals, who are now cooling their heels in a prison cell. The Irishmen are very indignant that while there are both Scotch and English regiments of Guards, there is not one in which their own nationality is exclusively represented. Whenever an Irishman mentions a grievance the proper thing to do is to sneer at him. So says society now-a-days. But in spite of Society, Erin seems to have the right on her side here. If she was admitted to the Union her sons ought to have their proper share of the fruits of that Union, and if there are national regiments which are better clothed, better fed, and more esteemed than others, Ireland ought decidedly to have one as well as England and Scotland. The Livingstone search expedition has at length set sail. Many people will imagine that it consists of a numerous party because of the significant title which has been given to it. It is in reality composed of four persons. These are Mr. Young, who has it in charge, John Reed and John Buckley, the one a mechanic and the other a seaman, and Mr. Henry Faulkner, who has volunteered to accompany it at his own ex- pense. They carry their steel boat with them. Of course the little band will be augmented by natives, so as to make travelling in the disturbed districts safe. It is expected that they will arrive at the scene of the supposed murder about the end of Sep- tember. Great excitement will naturally be created among Riflemen by the decision at which the Government has arrived regarding them. It haa been announced that they are liable to be called on to serve in the case of civil tumult. Certainly the volunteers never under- stood so. At the time the majority of them joined the force there was fear of a French invasion, and it was felt that our army was lamentably insufficient. The thought of desolated and desecrated homes caused old and young alike to rush to arms, but now that they find themselves liable to be called to assume them against their fellow-countrymen the case is different, and it is to be feared that unless the Government re- considers its decision the number of resignations sent in will not be few.

THE ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION…

EXAMINATION OF THE ASSASSIN.

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A STRANGE STORY.

LETTER FROM COUNT ZAMOYSKI.

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THE NEW BLACK DEATH.

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BIDDING FOR AN ACTOR.

CAPTURE OF A BRIGAND QUEEN..

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EXTRAORDINARY PROCEEDINGS…