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ISUMMARY GF PASSING EVENTS.…

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I SUMMARY GF PASSING EVENTS. ONE of the great events which have recently oc- curred has been the lajiug of the foundation-stone of the Hall of Arts and Sciences by her Majesty in State. The site for this magnificent building, which in its outline and formation is suggestive of the general features of the Colosseum at Rome, is on the vacant portion of the ground lying in the rear of the conservatory of the Royal Horticultural Gardens at Kensington, and abutting on the I southern side of the Kensiagton-road, immediately facing the Albert Memorial, in course of progress at the western end of the National Exhibition ground of 1851. The estimated cost of the build- ing is X200,000, and it is to be built under the direction of a provisional committee, of which the Prince of Wales is the chairman, and the manage- ment of the hall will be vested in a governing body under the authority of a Eoyal charter. The site was given by the Commissioners for the Exhibi- tion of 1851, and the funds for the erection of the building have been principally obtained by the sale of the boxes—the freehold of those on the first tier selling at Y,1,000 each, and those on the second tier .£500 each. The hall will accommodate 6,000 persons comfortably, and at a stretch 9,000. The purposes for which the great building are to be applied are the holding of national and inter- ^•tional congresses on subjects connected with ,t.ience and art. Monday was by no means '1"' Queen's weather," a drizzling rain fell nearly all day; nevertheless, her Majesty, though not so punctual as usual, arrived at the site of the hall, opposite the memorial to the Prince Consort, at half-past eleven o'clock, where a guard of honour was drawn up and received her Majesty with a Royal salute, and she was conducted to the tent by his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, the chairman, and other members of the committee. The ceremony of 'laying the stone was soon performed, a flourish of trampets announced that it was over, and her Majesty, attended by a cavalry escort, proceeded to Marlborough-house, being received everywhere with right loyal cheers from her people. THE Prince of Wales has spent a week in Paris, and is said thoroughly to have enjoyed himself there. Oa Friday there was a brilliant assembly at the British Embassy, given by Lord Cowley. The Emperor and Empress of the French and several Princes of Royal blood were present, together with the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Edinburgh. Twenty-four "illustrious person- ages," as the papers inform us, sat at the Prince's table. During the supper the Duke of Edinburgh's Highland piper, much to the amusement of the company, marched round the table playing the bagpipes. Then dancing set in, and continued until after daylight in the morning. Apropos of the International Exhibition in Paris, the multitudinous articles exhibited are now thoroughly classified and in order, and it may truly be said to be cne of the grandest world's fairs" that has ever been witnessed. The English do not come off with prizes so well as other j nations, and S->il Granville, wrheu presiding at Jhe I dinner, as Chancellor of the University of London, the other day, did not hesitate to endorse the declaration of the president of the Institution of Engineers, that "in steam machinery we have of late years made no improvement whatever that the same remark holds good of our manufacture of iron; and. that it is also, applicable to the ceram and other kindred arts. The fact is, a few years ago all the nations of the world were praising our industry and our manufactures; we were content to rest upon our oars, and if we do sot mind we shall be outpaced altogether." Lord Granville Eays England wants better education, that she is behind the civilised werld in this, "And depend upon it," said his lordship, "the best educated nation will win the victory and carry off the pri&e, whether it be in war, commerce, or fine arts. Oar rough industrialism was very useful to us in olden times; but the peoples of the world are being brought into closer contact ap-d keener competition, and mere muscular energy has not the same sure advantage it once had." Let us be wise in time, and educate the rising generation, and thus enable England to keep up her old prestige. HAPPILY we are at peace with all the world at present, and we trust there is no likelihood of our lapsing into war. Grave suspicions are echoed on the Continent as to the intentions of Prussia and France, notwithstanding the decision of the Conference; and be it known that at that great meeting of plenipotentiaries in London, Lord Stanley, on the part of England, did not guarantee the neutrality of Luxemburg, but simply advised the course to be taken to secure peace at least for the present, so that whatever may occur hereafter England will not be called upon except as a mediator, mutually selected. TELEGRAMS reach us of the defeat of Maxi- milian's forces in Mexico, and the capture of the Emperor, and some accounts reportthathis Majesty is shot. The Empress, it is said, is in France, hopelessly insane; the news does not now afflict her, as reason has fled, alld the long absence from her htlsband has almost led to her forgetfulness of him. TURKEY has again failed to conquer the Cretans. Omar Pasha, the first general in the Turkish army, was sent over to Candia with a number of picked soldiers, the Saltan making certain of victory; but three times did Omar Pasha attack the insurgents at Sphakia, and three times was he driven back. The Sultan is not, however, going to submit quietly to this defeat; he talks of a "re-organisation of the financial system," which means he wants a foreign loan; but we hardly think any nation win be foolish enough to lend Turkey any more money. VERY little news reaches us from America.' Jefferson Davis, on his release, made the best of his way to Canada, where we hope ho will live peaceably. Sad accounts reach us of the desti- tution to which American planters on the banks of the Mississippi hava been reduced by the flood- ing of the river. SEVERAL things call our attention to home matters. The Reform Bill introduced by the Government is pretty generally accepted by the House of Commons. Various alterations have been made in committee, amongst which lodgers are admitted to the franchise who pay -Xio per annum for unfurnished rooms, and henceforward there will be no compound householders, but every occupier of a house will have tQ pay his own rates, and thus be the burgesses' list. Very little doubt is expressed that the bill will pass through both Houses, and, receive the Boy a 1 as- sent during the present Session. IT was rumoured that Burke, the Fenian con- demned to death in Dublin, had been reprieved. This, says the Sunday Gazette; is premature. TUB Irish Government wish to carry the sentence into effect, but her Majesty is averse to it, and the probability is that the poor deluded man's life will be spared. A COMMISSION has been appointed to inquire into the trade outrages in Sheffield and its neigh- bourhood. There are no less than from 200 to 300 cases of intimidation to be inquired into. The great question," says a Sheffield paper, will be whether what we call in this country outrages '-i:ojUriES inflicted on persons and property by violence or incendiary explosions- can be brought home to the committees or officers of trades' unions as the perpetrators or in- stigators." A REMARKABLE scene took pla.ce at the triennial visitation of the Bishop of Salisbury, held at Bridport. The bishop claimed for the ministers under his charge supernatural powers and pre- rogatives, when one of his clergy, a rector in the ¡ diocese, after repeating the bishop's words, "that I there was a time to speak and a time to be sisent," called on those who were on the Lord's side to follow him, and walked out of the church. This created a profound impression, and it was some time before his lordship could continue his charge. The churchwardens afterwardshdd a meeting, at which an address to the bishop, protesting against ritualism, was unanimously adopted. This has been followed by a rather severe letter in the Times, written by Lord S. G. Osborne, who condemns the doctrines of the bishop. (It

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