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BOROUGH PETTY SESSIONS.

ARCHDEACON'S VISITATION.

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FOREIGN AND BRITISH BREEDS…

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FOREIGN AND BRITISH BREEDS OF CATTLE. ■ Continued.. THE ZEBU. In India the species of oxen called the Zebu is very nnmerous, they vary in size from ordinary cattle to that of a Newfoundland dog the limbs are of a deer-like shape, in the shoulders there is a fatty lump, which has been known to weigh 50lbs. they are used for the purposes of com- merce, draught, bearing burdens, &c. they are also used by the Princes of India in their state processions; their motion is easy, they can trot and gallop almost as freely as a horse, and can go about 20 to 30 miles a day—some say 50 or 60 miles The milk-white colour is highly esteemed by the Hindoos, as having a character of sanctity, hence the name of "Brahmin Bull." Very often rich Hindoos dedicate a bull of this color to SIVA, one of their gods he is branded with the emblem of the god, and is thenceforth exempt from labour and wanders where he will, no one strikes or molests him,—if he lies down in a narrow lane no one can pass until he gets up of his own accord he feeds in gardens and rice fields; or whenever he chooses to enter the market place, helps himself to the choicest fruit, or the" most tempting pastry on the green-grocer or confectioner's stalls, the poor trades- men being silent but no doubt unwilling witnesses of his dainty repast. We might observe here the wTmderful arrange- ment of Providence in the adaptation of animals to the donate. In India and hot climates the heavy ox of Holland and England could not exist for any time, hence we find a less bulky and more agile beast like the Rebu. THE YAK, OR GRUNTING OX. In the North of India and Central Asia another species of foreign cattle meets us—the Yak, or, Grunting Ox. He is stout in form, short muscu- lar limbs, and his tail resembles that of the horse- hence he has been called by some the horse-tailed Buffalo they vary much in size, there must have been some exceedingly large—judging from the tail of one preserved in the British Museum which measures six feet long they are the only species cultivated by the Tartar tribes they are a hardy sure-footed beast, the hair supplies them with ropes and tents, their skins provide them with coverings the milk is good and yields excellent butter. A profitable trade is carried on by the Tartars in disposing of the white tails which these oxen possess. These tails are dyed of various colours, and are in request all over the east, being used as standards in Persia, Turkey, &c. In India they are used as fans, with beautiful ivory handles for driving off the flies the Chinese use them for ornaments on their bonnets—on the same principle as our modern ladies have so extensively patronised Natural History in the use of birds, wings, &c. as ornaments. One peculiarity of this anim Ll is that instea.d of bellowing like ordinary cattle it grunts like a pig.

BRITISH CATTLE.

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'--------'-----.-BRECON AND…

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