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AGRICULTURE. -

A DOG KILLED BY BATS.

JfIBS COBBE OR THE NEW MILLINERY…

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JfIBS COBBE OR THE NEW MILLINERY EXPERIMENT. Miss Cobbe thus describes the headquarters of the London Dressmakers' Company "A good large house, No. 18, Clifford-street, situate in the centre of those happy hunting grounds of fair dames, which are bounded by Marshall and Snelgrove's on the north, and Howell and James's on the south, with Bond-street and Regent-street to the east and west. Fair sized showrooms on the first floor, with the usual amount of those pomps and vanities in silk, velvet, and lace which, thanks to their godfathers and godmothers, the adies of Mayfair and Belgravia have so utterly renounced. Upstairs, second floor, large plain workrooms, with the brightest possible fires (the day of my visit was cold), and some 30 girls and young women distributed about, performing those occult processes of hem- ming, stitching, goring, pinking, fitting, sloping, and all the rest of it. How far these various tasks, from the high art of fitting a bodice to the humble mechanism of hemming a seam, were adequately fulfilled I shall not presume to decide, but one remark I may fearlessly make. The young workers looked as healthy as so many country girls, and were certainly chattering as cheerfully as so many magpies. The peculiar physiognomy which some experience of overworked girls has taught me to associate with needlewomen—the large bright eyes, the thickened skin, a certain degeneration of nose and upper lip—were nowhere to be seen. There were no tokens of sitting 14 hours a day at a task which, from its nature, can give neither play to the muscles nor thought to the brain, only monotonous irritation of nerves anclruinous wearing out of eyesight. The young women in Clifford-street were visibly leading a life as healthy (per- haps a good deal healthier) than that of the ladies whose robes they were manufacturing. I was assured they never work after eight of an evening or before half-past eight of a morning, and that they have an hour and a half of leisure for the wholesome meals of the day, and, of course, the Sunday for exercise and rest. In the spare time so secured their friends, the directors of the company, and the cheerful, kindly superintendent, have provided for them, at their option, several healthful amusements singing classes, calesthenic lessons, and abundance of pleasant books. Above the workrooms I saw the bedrooms of the girls, clean and airy chambers of reasonable size, with white curtains dividing each of the four or five beds, with their dressing-tables, one from another." :J .WIII

-----PASSENGERS' ~BAGGAGEMAND…

. THE POLIOE PERJURY CASE.

[No title]

FACTS AND F ACETIÆ. .

--------HUlTS UPON GAR.DENI13"G.…

-------------------------SPORTS…

A VISIT TO WHITEC!R OSS-S…