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A SKETCH OF AN OLD BACHELOR,…

EPITOME OF NEWS. .:.0_""--,,

LAUNCH OF " THE QUIVER " LIFEBOAT…

FATAL COLLISION ON THE LONDON…

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FATAL COLLISION ON THE LONDON AND BRIGHTON BAIL WAT. On Saturday night, at about half-past nine o'clock a collision occurred between two trains on the Mid- Sussex portion of this line at a place known as the Itchingfield Junction, about three miles on the Shore- ham side of Horsham. One man lost his life, and several passengers were severely injured. From inquiries made from passengers and others it appears that on Saturday night the 7.40 train from London- bridge to Littlebampton and Portsmouth was fifteen or twenty minutes behind at starting. It is a quicks train, making comparatively few stoppages on the journey; but as it has a third class attached to it, is the last night train to Portsmouth, aud is in com- munication at Littlehampton with the Jersey and St. Malo screw steamers, it is a favourite train with the public. Being late at starting, the train was also behind time when it arrived at Three Bridges, and it was likewise late on passing Horsham, where, how- ever, it did not stop. At Three Bridges the train was handed over to a driver named Edward Ray, and to Ode and James, head and under guards. On reaching the Itchingfield Junction, which is the point where the Shoreham branch via Steyning and Henfield enters the Mid-Sussex line, the 7.15 up train from Brighton and Shoreham had just arrived, and was in the act of crossing on to the main line. The Steyning and Henfield branch is a single line, and the guard, whose name is Burgess, was in the act of exhibiting his staff from the window to the signalman, to indicate that there was nothing behind, when his break was run into by the down London train, the engine of which ran into the other immediately between the tender and the guards' van next to the engine. On the locomotive of the up train, along with the driver, was his fireman, John Snatt, who was killed on the spot. The drivers of both engines escaped comparatively unhurt, whilst Burgess, the guard, did not sustain a scratch, although his break was shivered to atoms. The up train happened to be an unusually light one, whilst the down train was more than ordinarily heavy. Had the up train contained more passengers, or had it been run into nearer the centre, the casualties must have been alarming in the highest degree. As it was, the majority of those who suffered were passengers by the down train, several of whom have sustained fractures of the leg or other limbs, but up to Sunday night no other fatal oases had occurred. On examina- tion it was found that a great many of the carriages had been shivered to pieces; one second-claas carriage was cut completely in two, and a third-class carriage, which was near the engine on the down train, was reduced to a complete wreck. By dint of great exer- tions the line was cleared and the wounded passengers attended to. Some, who were able to walk, made their way to Horsham. Others who were more hurt were conveyed there by train, and others who were en route to the Chan- nel Islands were taken by train to Littlehampton, and placed on board the Honfleur, which was to have been dispatched at 12 o'clock an Saturday night, but which, owing to the accident, delayed her Bailing until noon, on Sunday. Several of her passengers are suffering severely from their injuries. The accident has been attributed to a disregard of signals, but a judicial in- quiry will, of course, deal with that question.

NARROW ESCAPE OF MADAME ANNA…

- DEATH FROM DROWNING.