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. AGRICULTURE.I

HINTS UPON GAJELDjSIMIISrG.…

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. -+---

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MURDER OF TWO CHILDREN AND…

A PROSPEROUS MAN AND HIS FANCIED…

THE MURDER NEAR GATESHEAD.

THE DOG AND HER PUPPIES-DIB…

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LOVERS' QUARRELS.

BREACH OF PROMISE OF MARRIAGE.

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BREACH OF PROMISE OF MARRIAGE. In the Court of Common Pleas the case of Kemp v. Harris was concluded on Wednesday. The defendant, a Jew, had kept the King and Queen public-house, Newington-butts, and the plaintiff was barmaid there during his occupancy. Her case was not only that the defendant had promised her marriage, but that he had after the promise seduced her. Since then the defen- dant had married a Miss Hart, who was now his wife. Mr. Digby Seymour and Mr. T. Salter appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. D. Keane, Q.C., and Mr. F. Turner for the defendant. Mr. Keane summed up the evidence which had been given on the part of the defendant, and contended that the evidence given would not warrant the jury in finding that there had been any promise to marry made; but in the event of the jury being against him upon that point, he urged upon them that the case was one in which small damages only would be con- sistent with justice. According to the plaintiff's own case she had lost only a worthless man, certainly a poor one, and one whom his own father considered to be a fast young man. Mr. D. Seymour wished it to be borne in mind that the defendant's counsel, who had begun by defaming the character of the plaintiff, had ended by doing what he could to destroy that of his own client. The plain facts were that three witnesses had spoken distinctly to references to a promise to marry by the defendant, whilst on the other hand there was nothing but certain circumstances from which the jury were asked to infer that there had been no promise. He had no doubt the jury would believe the positive state- ments rather than rely upon the suggested inferences; and especially so as when the defendant was written to by Mr. Endean and charged with breaking his promise, also with seduction, he simply acknowledged the receipt of the letter, and in no way denied what was charged against him. Taking the promise to have been established, he urged upon the jury that the plaintiff had established her right to substantial damages for the wrong which had been done her. Mr. Justice Byles, in summing up, said that some questions had been put in cross-examination reflecting upon the plaintiff which in his opinion ought not to have been put, because the plaintiff could not by law be called to contradict the aspersions cast upon her; and other evidence had been offered which not only was inadmissible, but the very tender of it was likely seriously to prejudice the plaintiff's case. His lord- ship also went carefully through the evidence, and left it to the jury to say whether they thought that the promise had been made out; and if so, to what amount the plaintiff was entitled for the breach of it. The jury after considering the matter for a few minutes, found for the plaintiff-Damages, X150. There was some attempt at applause when the ver- dict was pronounced.

A WOMAN BRUTALLY MURDERED…

THE QUEEN IN THE HIGHLANDS.

FACTS AND FACETIAE. —♦—

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