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c--IMPERIAL PAELIAIMT. .RT…

DEPARTURE OF TEE GREAT EASTERN.

[No title]

MARSHAL BENEDEK'S ARMY.

FEMALE, HOUSEBOLDERS AND TEE…

SINGULAR GBARGE OF HORSE-STEALING.

.ACCIDENT TO TEE PRINCE OF…

REFORM MEETINGS.

SMOTHERING. A MAN WITH PITCH.

MR. PEABODY IN AMERICA,

[No title]

MURDER AND SUICIDE IN .CAMBRIDGESHIRE.

POCKET-PICKING AT THE THAMES…

HOOTIimS moM~THM HOWL."

TEE CHARGE OF STABBING A MOTHER…

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------:4 BRIDE-RACING: FORMS…

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-:4 BRIDE-RACING: FORMS OF ESPOUSAL IN UNCIVILISED COUNTRIES. Let us take a Turanian example of bride-racing. The ceremony, which is performed on horseback, is described by Dr. Clarke. A girl is firat mounted, who rides off at fall speed. Her lover pursues; if he overtakes her she becomes his wife. But it sometimes happens that the woman does not wish to marry the parson bv whom she is pursued. In this case she will not suffer him to overtake her. We are assured that no instance occurs of a Kalmuck girl being thus caught unless she has a partiality to the pursuer. If she dislikes him she rides, to use the langu- age sf English sportsmen, 'neck or nought,' until she has completely effected her escape, or until her pursuer's horse becomes exhausted, leaving her at liberty to return, and to be afterwards chased by some more favoured lover." That is, the chase, where it leads to marriage, as it commonly does, is a mere form, the woman meaning to be caught. As it is always preceded by a contract, fixing the fcrida's price and consenting to the marriage, it is un- doubtedly a merely symbolical ceremony, in which the idea is that of the "unprotected female" trying to escape from her would-be captor. The chaaee of escape which it offers to a reluctant bride is an acci- dent of a ceremony, the origin of which cannot possibly be referred to the desire to consult the bride's inclina- tions. Vaaibery says that this marriage ceremonial," no doubt, with modifications from case to case, is in use among all the nomads of Central Asia. Ha de- scribes it in the case of the Turkomans. The young maiden, attired in bridal costume, mounts a high-bred caurser, taking on her lap the carcass of a lamb or goat. She sets off at full gallop, followed by the bridegroom and other young men of the pe.rty, also on horseback. She has always to strive, by adroit turns, &c., to avoid her pursuers, that no one of them approach near enough to snatch from her the burden in her lap. The chase ends, I suppose, in her being caught. "The game" is called Kokfciiri. But all wild tribes have not troops of horses like the hordes of Central Asia. When the Australian, who gets his wives by the ancient methods de facto, chases a leubra, it is on foot. Should he ever raduca the race to a symbol, the symbol will certainly represent a foot-race. And this is the form of bride-racing among the natives of Singapore, who also, being accustomed to boating, have an aquatic variety of the form. They hold great j ubilees, at the fruit season, near the groves of the tribe, which often lie together, and during these jubilees their marriages take place. "Tae marriage ceremony," says Mr. Cameron, is a simple one, t4nd the new acquaintance of the morning is often the bride of the evening. On the part of the suitor it is more a matter of arrange- ment with the parents than of courtship with the daughter; but there is a form generally observed which reminds one strongly of the old taleofHippo- menes and Atalanta. If the tribe is on the bank of a lake or stream, the damsel is given a canoe and a, double-bladed paddle, and allowed a start of some distance; the suitor, similarly equipped, starts off in chase. If he succeeds in overtaking her, ahe becomes his wife; if not, the match is broken off. It ia seldom that objection is offered at the last moment, and the race is generally a short one. The maiden's arms are strong, but her heart is soft, and her notare warm, and she soma. becomes a willing captive. If the marriage takes place where no scream is near, a round circle of a certain size is formed, the damsel is stripped of all but a waistband, and given half the circle's start in advance; and if she succeeds in running three times round before her suitor comes up with her, she is entitled to remain a virgin; if not she must consent to the bonds of matrimony. As in the other case, but fe.v outstrip their lovers." This is the Kalmuck case over again. Singapore is not singular in the equatorial regions. We find the form both as bride-racing and as brida-catching in various quarters-ia the islands of the Pooifi(i.-The Argosy.

AN ECCENTRIC NOBLEMAN.

THE CASE OF MADAME VALENTIN.

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