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COLONEL DA WKINS AND HIS SUPERIOR…

'CURIOUS STORY OF A MODERN…

A DEBAUCHED LIFE: SHOCKING…

IMPORTANT DECISION: THE EXTRADI.…

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IMPORTANT DECISION: THE EXTRADI- TION TREATY BETWEEN ENGLAND AND FRANCE'. In the Chancery Court, on Saturday, before the Lord Chancellor, Mr. M*Mahon moved that a writ of haeascorpus be issued to bring up the body of Victor Widemann, that he osight be discharged from Clerkeu- well Prison, in which he was detained preparatory to his being surrendered to the Government of France on a charge of fraudulent bankruptcy. He said the ground on which he relied was simply this. That the extradition treaty had expired by the Frsrxsh Govern. ment having given a six months' notice on the 4th of last December to discontinue it. The Attorney-General; The French Government has withdrawn that notice. Mr. M'Mahen contended that as nothing was said in the 6 and 7 Vic., cap. 75, which was passed for the ratification of the treaty, about either of the contract- ing parties being ai liberty to withdraw a notice of discontinuance, the treaty was not received by the with- drawal of the notice given by the French Government in December last. He contended that under the notice of the 4th of December the treaty expired on the 5th inst., and that the before-mentioned Act itself was now abrogated by that notice. The language of that treaty was explicit and unequivocal, to the effect that in six months' from the giving of such notice the treaty should expire, and consequently such notice once given was irrevocable. It could hardly be pretended that a simple diplomatic note from one of the French minis- ters could have the effect of reviving or prolonging the existence of an Act of Parliament which would other- Wl^have lapsed by its own provisions. withouthearing the Solicitor- General, who appeared m opposition to the motion, the Lord Chancellor said taa Act of Parliament waa in force as long as the con- vention was in force. The convention was a conven- tion whereby certain stipulations were made for the de- livermg up of persons charged with crimes in the two countries. He would not enter into the details of the Act, for he did not know the nature of this case. The only question before him was whether thia convention was m iorce. It was certainly in force unless a cer- tain valid notice had been, given by either of the con- tracting parties that it should be discontinued. Now, what were the facts of this case P On the 4 th of December. notice was given by the French Government to determine it at toe emj of six months—that was to say, by the 4ta mau.—and ifc would then have expired had not the French ambassador by a note, dated the 2.1st of May, intimated the desire of his Government for the continuance ot the treaty for six months more. Surely the contracting parties might agree by that means to keep the convention in force for that period. HaagreeG. with t.he learned counsel in this, and if six ir,onthe had expired before intimation was given by the French Government of their desire that the treaty I should coatinue. till December next the Act of Parlia- ment would have expired, because the convention itself in that case: would have coma to 03. end; Thia J applieafcbu lades <^e8eoiroamsflan«s8ajnus^,be.c«s#aeiv <

THE MINISTRY AND THE COUNTRY.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE RETURNS.

HEARTLESS ROBBERY.

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|CONSOLIDATED BANK (LIMITED)..

LODGINGS.

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-........,....,.--IMPERIAL…

ACCIDENT ON THE GREAT WESTERN…

REFORM MEETING AT LAMBETH-