Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

COLONEL DA WKINS AND HIS SUPERIOR…

News
Cite
Share

COLONEL DA WKINS AND HIS SUPERIOR OFFICES. The case of Dawkins r. Lord Sokebv occupied the attention of the Court; of Common Pleas for several days last week. The actioa arose out of circumstances which have been frequently before the public. The plaintiff was William Gregory Dawkins, a captain and lieutenant- 'eal oolonel in the Coldstream Guards, and he sued Lord Rokeby, the colonel of the regiment, to recover dances for false imprisonment in placing him under arrest, and for causing him to be compelled to sell his commission, or to go upon half-pay. The defendant pleaded Not Guilty, ander the ^Mr/^Karsiake, in opening the case, said that the plftintiff was the son of Colonel Dawkins, of the Cold- Streams, an officer who served with distinction under the Duke of Wellington in the Peninsula. Tne plain- tiff had himself been for many years in his regiment, and he sarveS throughout the Sebastopol campaign. The action was brought for the investigation of some cireumetanoe that ought to have been disposed of before a court-martial, a tribunal which, however, had been refused to the plaintiff. The facts extended over several years, and there had been a great deal of cor- respondence upon the matter, but, in general terms, the charges now brought against the defendant were these :—That some time ago he ordered the arrest Iof the plajntiff under pretence that he had committed a military offence that ho had not in fact committed, -and that having caused his arrest he neglected to being the plaintiff before a court-martial. That having done this some years ago, the defendant had from time to time made statements alone and in company with other officers who owed Colonel Dawkins a grudge. and at last they had induced the Duke of Cambridge, without allowing Colonel Dawkins a court-martial, to call upon him either to go on half- gay or to reign his commission altogether. The learned counsel having stated the circumstances in detail, complained principally that the plaintiff had been placed in arrest, and so kept for 1-1 days, for having refused at the camp at Ash, in 1860, to shake hands with Colonel Lord Rokeby, his com- manding officer, at the same time, however, sa- luting him as his superior. This conduct, it was contended, was no offence against military law, and it further would be urged that even if offence had been committed, it was illegal to keep the plaintiff under arrest for more than eight days without bringing him before a court-martial. A great deal of correspondence took place in reference to a variety of complaints which were made, and matters went on till the 30th June, 1884, when Lord F. Paulet told the plaintiff that he waa utterly nnfit to com- mand, and that he should not .cotnmand so long as he (Lord F. Paulet) had anything to do with the_ regi- ment. This course was acted upon on the occasion of a. review in Hyde-park, which took place in July, when the .plaintiff was superseded, and when he asked what he was to do he was told that he might go horns. Fscm that time insult after insult was heaped upon him, ana at the court of inquiry which was held Lord iRokeby justified thg statement that the plaintiff was unfit to command by referring to what had taken place at Ash m I860. xn 1805 there was another out Oj- inquiry, when the old story and others were again r aaea up, and Lora Rokeby and other officers said that the plaintiff s temper was so infirm that he was not fit to command, and Lord Rokeby even went so far as to say that the plaintiff was mad at times. Upon the report of the court of xcquiry the commander-in- chief ordered that the plaintm ehoaiaresiga or go upon half-pay, and he refused the plaintiff's repeated re- quests for a court-martial, before whichpEooeedicgs of a regular kind could be taken, ana evidence on oath received, instead of the mere statements upon which courts of inquiry acted. The result wag that the plaintiff was compelled to leave the regiment and go upon half-pay.. The plaintiff was then examined at great length, and the case came to a conclusion on Friday atternoon, when Mr. Justice Willes said he was of opInion that the questions brought before the Court were entirely of a military character, to be dealt with by court-mar- tial, and could not be taken cognisance of by a court of law. He therefore nonsuited the plaintiff.

'CURIOUS STORY OF A MODERN…

A DEBAUCHED LIFE: SHOCKING…

IMPORTANT DECISION: THE EXTRADI.…

THE MINISTRY AND THE COUNTRY.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE RETURNS.

HEARTLESS ROBBERY.

[No title]

|CONSOLIDATED BANK (LIMITED)..

LODGINGS.

[No title]

[No title]

-........,....,.--IMPERIAL…

ACCIDENT ON THE GREAT WESTERN…

REFORM MEETING AT LAMBETH-