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AGRICULTURE.J -----

HINTS UPON GARDENIira. --

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. --

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT OF FEMALES.

I.THE PRINTERS' PhNSION, ALMSHOUSE,…

GUNNERY EXPERIMENTS ON THE…

ISINGULAR CHARGE OF STEALING…

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SINGULAR CHARGE OF STEALING AND RECEIVING. John Lovett, carman to Mr. Humphreys, of Dock- head, a timber merchant, and Henry Clark, of 4, Adelaide-place, Lower Whitecross-street, woodcutter, appeared at the London Guildhall on remand—the former charged with stealing eighteen cubic feet of his master's timber, and the latter with receiving the same well knowing it to be stolen. It appeared from the evidence that on Monday morning Lovett was sent with half a fathom of deal ends for box-making to Mr. Lines, Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row, and that on the way from Dockhead he gave his horse and cart in charge to another man, and went on a message for his father, and met the cart coming home, and took charge of it again. It, how- ever, happened that William Curtis, a woodcutter, in the employ of Mrs. Hay ley, a woodcutter, carrying on business in Golden-lane, saw Mr. Humphrey's cart in front of Clark's shop, and saw the carman throwing out the wood to Clark, who put it down in his cellar. He knew the cart because his mistress dealt with Mr. Humphreys. He called a policeman's attention to it, and followed the cart to Mr. Lines, where the re- mainder of the timber was delivered. After the cart left he gave information of what he had seen to Mr. Lines, and Mr. Humphreys was communicated with. When Lovett came back, William Hope, the foreman, questioned him as to how he could account for the timber being short, and he said he had delivered it all to Mr. Lines. Hope insisted upon his going over to Mr. Lines with him, and on the way he said that he had entrusted the cart to another man, whom he named, to deliver the wood for him. They went to Mr. Lines's premises and measured the 'timber, which proved to be 18 clibia feet short of the quantity. Hope then took a policeman with him, and went to Clark's house, and in the cellar found a quantity of timber similar to that sent to Mr. Lines. They took away thirty-nine pieces, which would make up the quantity that was found to be deficient in the delivery. Clark was subsequently given into custody, and charged with receiving it with a guilty knowledge, whereupon Clark denied that he had received any timber that morning. Mr. Buchanan, who appeared for both the prisoners, cross-examined the witness at great length, and elicited from Hope the fact that there were no marks upon the wood by which he could identify it, and that there was a quantity of the same description of timber left behind. He took the thirty-nine pieces away, not that he could identify them as Mr. Humphreys', but because they made up the quantity he had missed out of the cart. Clark had dealt with Mr. Humphreys for timber for making bundle-wood for over two years, but during the whole of that time he had never purchased timber of the quality in question, the timber for bundle-wood being of an inferior description. He believed that the deal ends he left behind had been the property of Mr. Humphreys, but he had never sold any of it to Clark. The prisoners were remanded, but admitted to bail, one surety in X20, and themselves in X20 each.

THE LOVE OF FINERY.

FACTS AND FACErplM. —♦—

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