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THE GABN0N-8TRBET MURDER.I

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THE GABN0N-8TRBET MURDER. At the Central Criminal Court, Old Eailey, on j Wednesday, William Smith, alias William Denton, was brought up for trial, before Mr. Baron Bramwell, charged with the wilful murder of Sarah Miisom, housekeeper to Messrs. Bevingion, Cannon-atrsefc, on Wednesday, the 11th of April last. The prosecution was conducted by Mr. Metoalfe and Mr. Straight, and the defence by Mr. Serjeant Balian- tine and Mr. Montague Williams. The prisoner, wha waa respectably dressed in hlack clothes, entered the dock in a very self-possessed man. ner, and on the charge being read to him he answered, in a clear steadv voice. Not Gnilfcv" Mr. Metcalfe then addressed the jury, and laid before them the circumstances of the case. After adverting to the prisoner's acauaintanoeship with the man named Terry, his having written to Mrs. Milsom, and after- wards receiving several sums of money from her, and signing Terry's name in the receipts, the learned coun- sel alluded to the movements of the prisoner on the night of the murder, and said that if the proof was conclusive to show that he was the man who left Messrs. Bevingtor.'p. at ten minutes after ten on that evening, there could ba very little doubt: aa to who committed the deed. Evidenca was then adduced. iiaward Kipps said he was in the service of Messrs. Bevington, of Cannon-straefi. It was his duty to see the place locked up every evening, and to see every- body off the premises. On Wednesday, 11th April, everything: was locked up, and the keys were, as usual, given to Mrs. Milsom, who, with the cook, were the only persons on the premises. Inside the front door there were a couple of swing doors, bat«reea which there was a light. There were four bolts and a latch and chain to the outer door. By Mr. Ballantine lgri. Milsom very rarely went out. From her appearance he would take her to be between 40 and 50 years of age. Mrs. Lowes said she was cook at Messrs. Bevington's, and had been there between nine and ten years. The first floor and part of the second were nsad as counting- houses. On Wednesday, April 11th, about ten minutes to nine, there was a ricg at the bell. Mrs. Millsom answered it. She was then in perfect health. I never saw her again alive. Aboul. ti quarter past ten, as she did not return., witness went downstairs and found deceased lying at the aoor. Under the impression that she was in a fit, witness took hold ef her hand. She waited till a police-constable came. He told her to wait till he came back from the station. It was than found that Mrs. Milsom was dead. The bell was rung frequently in the evening. On two occasions deceased borrowed XI from witness-the first time on a Friday, and the next on the following day, Saturday. Oa the Saturday that the sovereign was borrowed a ring came to the door. Mrs. Milsom answered the door, and it was after doing eo that she came and askad for the sove- reign. Witness looked out at the window and saw a man leaving. The police deposed to the finding of the body when they were called in, and Dr. May gave evidence as to the nature of the wounds inflicted after which John Moss, a detective officer, witnessed to the apprehen- sion of the prisoner at Windsor. The evidence given was the same as has already been at length before the public. The Clerk of the Court then read the letter written by the prisoner to Mrs. Milsom, on the back of which was the receipt signed, Wm. Denton, for George Terry." In cross-exammatioa by Mr. Ballantine, the last witness, Moss, said, I wrote down his answers to my questions1 at Windsor Poiiea-statioh half an hour after- wards. The blood was not on the ecatth-it he had on when in custody. The spots turned out not to be blood. I suggested that two police-constablea should walk by his side to convey him to the Mansion-hous. I had heard that he was to betaken by Cannon-street, so as to give Mrs. Bobbins and the servant maid next door a fair chance of identifying- him. I did not know that Mrs. Eobbins was to be looking out of the window. He was put among some of the prisoners afterwards for the purpose of seeing whether the women could point out the prisoner. Inspector Foulger said that after the death of Mrs. Milsom Mrs. Bobbins came to the police-station and gave him some information. When the prisoner was taken from Bow-lane to the Mansion-house he was taken through Cannon-street. There were no indica- tions to show that he was a prisoner, A policeman was manacled and put into a cab. There was a great crowd, and this was done to deceive them, and make them believe that he was the prisoner. Mrs. Robbins was t-ald to be in Cannon-street to see if they could recognise the prisoner. The girl did so, but Mrs. Robbins said she had not seen any one whom she knew. Isabella Cox, residing at New Kent-road, said she had been in the habit of calling on Mrs. Milsom, and had sometimes slept with her. While at Cannon- street she had heard the bell ring. On such occasions the deceased got agitated. She sometimes stayed at the door half an hour or three-quarters of an hour. Deceased had spoken to her about the person who called. Amelia Frances Long, Rose-street. Shoreditch, de- posed that she did washing for Mrs. Milaom. On one occasion a man called at Cannon-street while witness was there. Mrs. Milsom started back, and made an exclamation. Witness followed the man some distance. She took the prisoner whom she had seen at Newgate to be the man by his walk, but, judging by his features, she did not think he was the same. Catherine Collins was a servant next door to Messrs. Bevington's. Had seen a man call frequently there. To the best of her belief the prisoner was the man. I was told to stand in Messrs. Bevington's door on the day the prisoner was taken to the Mansion-house, for the purpose of seeing whether I could recognise the man who had called on Mrs. Milsom. I did recog- nise the man. I think he was bet wean two men. Foulger was about the length of the jury-box (four or five yards) before them. There were other passers by. I did not see the policemen who were with the pri- soner, or that they were policemen. I asked Mrs. Robbins If she knew any of those who passed. She said no; she was so confused that she did not recog- nise any one. Mrs. Arabella Collins: I am housekeeper at No. 1, Cannon. street, City. On Wednesday, April 11th, I went out at eight o'clock, and returned about ten minutes past ten. On my return my attention was attracted by a man leaving Mrs. Bevington's door. When he passed me he gave me a side look. He walked in a very hurried manner towards London- bridge. I then went in. His legs were very thin, his feet broad, and he walked fiat-footed. At Newgate I pointed out the prisoner and said I believed him to be the man. On the day that he was taken to the Man- sion-house I did not recognise him in Cannon-street, I was so confused. The man who passed me on the night of the murder wore a high hat and black clothes. George Terry: I am; at present an inmate of St. Olave's Workhouse. While Mrs. Milsom's husband was living we lived next door to them. Mrs. Milsom borrowed some money from my wife—not quite .£35. I got into difficulties after that. About the end of last year I got acquainted with Smith. We went into a public-house and wrote a note to Mrs. Milsom. I pointed out Messrs. Bevington's warehouse to him. He went and delivered the note. He asked me how much he thought he had got. I said £ He said no — £ 1. He gave it to me and I gave him 5a. I did not know that he had gone and got money after that. By Mr. Ballantine: The money was lent by my wife. I call her my wife, but I mean tha woman I lived with. Her proper name is Eiuton. She is not with me now. Mrs. Webber said she resided at Botherhithe. She believed her husband was alive (laughter). He was in Australia. She knew Terry. Witness gave Terry's wife .£33 to lend to Mrs. Milsom. It was to be paid back at the rate of 10s. a week, but payment was stopped. In all she received about £ 8. She never au- thorised Terry or the prisoner to receive any money for her. She called on Mrs. Milsom some time this year, and was told that a man had called twioe and got soma money. She told deceased not to give him any more. Henry Hunt,, a police-constable,, deposed to the ceased having sailed on him and shown him the letter and receipt., She was very much agitated. i Hemsy (Me&, fJrof}\ls. la!:i"!¡ Dtoa, dagssed to tha fact that the prisoner lived with his mother In Ston-square ™ continued: I was with him on the night of the 11th or 12 th April last, about seven in the evening. I asked him to come with me to a meeting. He said, No; ha had to go 40 miles that nighj. He had to g'o to London. I aaid that was not 40 mues. He persisted that it was. This conversation took place at Boanfield's beershop. Henry Blackmail, lamplighter, Eton Saw prisoner tne fifteen-arched bridge on Wednesday, April i f" vi-8 w'as a over a mile from. Slough j station. He wore a black coat and hat. It was about halt-past seven. John Whifcehouse, road surveyor: Knew the pri- a0BS- Met him between ssven and half-past seven going towards Slough station. Witness was going to priTate-taeatricala at the college, and it was this cir- Gumstance that fixed the time upon his mind. William Clark, police-coxstable, Eton, deposed to seeing the prisoner in High.street, Eton, at six o'clock on the night of the murder. He had on a black coat and hat, and had a walking-stick in his hand. Met him the same night at 20 minutes to 12 o'clock. Had said to a man named Harris that he had seen him after 11 o clock. Some evidence as to the distance from Eton-square to Windsor and Slough stations closed the case for the prosecution. j Mr. Serjeant Ballantine addressed the jury, and said m anything mora empty, more unsatisfactory, and more I utterly inconclusive never was submitted to 12 men placed in their position. He was sure that after they heard the evidence which he (Serjeant Ballantine) had to bring forward, every one in the court and out of it wouid be convinced that the prisoner was innocent, and was placed in his present position by a blunder, he cared not by whom committed. The learned coun- sel, in the course of his remarks, pointed oat that fchn Windsor station waa close at hand, and that the pri- soner might have gone to it instead of going to Slough station, which was further away, The guard Eaves was at this juncture recalled, and deposed that three carriages left Windsor at 7.30 p.m. and joined the Slough train. Mr. Ballantine fcnen proceeded with his address at great length, and asserted that he would prove that the prisoner was never out of Windsor on the night of £ 9 °^. pnd that the police were informed of this during the inquiry. It arose from this circum- stance: The friends had sprung up with the view of having the prisoner defended, who was himself a pauper, and had no means of employing counsel on his own behalf. At the olose of the learned counsel's remarks the case stood adjourned till next morning. Next morning', at ten o'clock, the proceedings were resumed. The prisoner exhibited the same self-pos- session. and coolness that he did on the previous day. Baron Bram well having taken his seat on the bench, the witnesses for the defence were examined. Mr. Metoalfe and Mr. Streight again appeared for the prosecution, and Serjeant Ballantine and Mr. Montagu Williams for the defence. The evidence for the defence was that of Henry Harris, a hatter's apprentice, of Eton John Harris, his father; Henry Costin, a photographer; John Frailing, a brazier; Mrs. Goddard, the landlady of a beershop; and several other witnesses, whose evi- dence went to substantiate an alibi. Jane Smithy the sister of the prisoner, wass then examined. »Sna said: The prisoner lives at home with my mother and another sister. My mother is laundress to a great many colleges. I was at home all day on Wednesday, the 11th of April, and I let the prisoner in when hu came home. It was a little after twelve o'clock. He went to bed immediately, and I did not observe anything unusual in his appearanoe. I know that he had only one shirt, and I am sure that nothing was done to any of the clothes he was wearing at this time. Louisa Smith, another sister of the prisoner, said that she saw the prisoner at breakfast on the morning of the 12th of April, and observed nothing unusual about him. He was dressed in a dark coat and light trousers. (This closed the case for the prisoner, and the court adjourned in order that the jury might take some refreshment.) Mr. Ballantine then proceeded to sum up the case for the prisoner, and he said that unless his feelings aisd his judgment were completely warped, it appeared to him that there naver was a case in which a prisoner bad been able so conclusively to establish, not that there was any doubt of his guilt, but his complete and extire innocence. He then reminded the jury that the case did not rest entirely upon the evidence of those persons who were companions of the prisoner, bat that one or two other witnesses, persons of the utmost respectability, and who could not have had the slîghtest motive for not speaking the truth, had depoged to seeing the prisoner at Windsor at an hour that would have rendered it utterly impossible for him to have committed the crime of which he was accused. The learned serjeant concluded by calling upon the jury to return a verdict that would have the effect of showing that a terrible mistake bad been committed, and that the blood of the unhappy woman did not rest upon the prisoner at the bar. There was a burst of applause at the conclusion of the address of the learned counsel. Mr. Metcalfe replied. The learned Judge having summed up, the jury re- turned a verdiot of Not Guilty. The prisoner was then discharged.

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