Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

10 articles on this Page

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. ..j

[No title]

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

la the House of Lords, on Friday, the Capital Punishmen Bill was taken in couimibtee. Lord St. Leonards moved the omission of the clause caus- iti executions to be conducted within the walls of prisons. amendment was opposed by thaDuke of Sichtnond, tti'3 Lord Chancellor, and tIle Bighelp, of Oxford. Eventually the clause was retained by 75 to 25. The bill passed through committee. The House adjourned at half-past seven o'clock. In the House of Commons, Mr. Grant asked whether, if the Bank of England were to reduce their rate of discount below 10 per cent. per annum, the power granted to them by the Government letter of issuing a larger amount of notes than fixed by law would cease. j The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that no power, j strictly so called, was conveyed by the letter; it was only I an engagement to make a certain application to Parliament j in certain circumstances. It was plain' that the letter I applied only to operations which were carried on when the J rate of interest was not below 10 per cent.; and if the Bank I reduced their rate before thiti the engagement in the letter I would determine. J Sir G. Bowyer asked whether her Majesty's Government j were prepared to cause an inquiry to be made, with a view J to affording adequate accommodation to members ip the j House, and prevent thereby the serious inconvenience which j members have suffered, especially during: this session, for | want of a sufficient number of seats, there being only ac- I commodation for 400 out of 658 members. In fact, it was a I misnomer to say that a member had a seat ia the House of 1 Commons. I | After some discussion, The Chancellor of the Exchequer said the subject was dis- I cussed on a former evening, and there was no objection to have it discussed, so that it was brought on formally, and I without all irregular interference with other business. The 1 right hon. gentleman then stated that mornrng sittmgs | would begin on Tuesday next. | On going into committee of supply, Mr. Barclay called attention to the effect of the differen- i tial duties on sugar; contending that the classification now in existence had prevented the free importation of first quality sugarsprom the colonies, and tended to keep that quality from general use amongst the less wealthy in this country. The Chancellor of the Exchequer said the difficulties of a uniform duty on sugar were such that it was not easy to deal with them. There being so great a variety of qualities of sugar, it had been thought best by the legislature to classify the duties, with a view to adjust them to those different qualities; nor was fehis to be taken as inconsistent with free trade. The right hon. gentleman then entered at length into the whole history of the sugar duties, bringing it up to its present position, and stating that a series of ex- periments were being made internationally by repre- sentatives of sugar-producing countries, with a view here- after to adjust the duties internationally; and when the result was obtained it would be the duty of the Government to come to a decision, and to ask the opinion of the House upon it. Mr. Bright thought the best solution of the difficulty of the sugar duty would be to took forward at no distant day —by increase of revenue from other sources, reduction of expenditure, and letting the national debt aloue-to the abolition of the impost, and this might be done by a reduc- tion of a million a year until it was extinguished. Mr. Ewart moved an address to her Majesty, praying that she will be pleased to cause to be placed within the precincts of the house a bust, offered by his widow, of the late Joseph Hume, who for nearly forty years ably, laboriously, and disinterestedly served his country in the House of Commons. f j Colonel Sykes, Mr. M'Laren, and Mr, Kinnaird having eulogised the late Mr. Hu: le, and Mr. D. Griffith having suggested that it was desirable not to create a precedent for j accepting memorials to members of the House from their own families, The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that the acceptance of a memorial of this kind ought not to pass as a matter of course; but this was perhaps an exceptional case, and he, on the part of the Government, gave a cheerful assent to the proposition. The right hon. gentleman passed a high eulogium on the character and public conduct of Mr. Hume. The motion was a,greed to. Mr. Bynan called attention to the treatment of prisoners in the gaol of Limerick under the Habeas Corpus Suspension (Ireland) Act, and moved that that treatment has been un- necessarily severe, and that it is the duty of the Government to prevent the continuance of the same. Mr. Blake seconded the motion. I Mr. C. Fortescue stated that the Irish Government were not responsible for any acts done by any superintending authorities of particular gaols; but inquiry had been made into the case now in question by the executive in Ireland, and the facts as stated by Mr. Synan being found to be sub- stantially correct, directions were given to modify the treatment of the prisoners. Mr. Maguire urged that a similar treatment was adopted towards prisoners in other gaols in Ireland, in Belfast especially, and demanded the interference of the Govern- ment. The Attorney-General said that intimation Iiad been given to the authorities of every gaol in Ireland for the mitigation of the treatment of the prisoners; and that not one of those prisoners would be detained a moment longer than was necessary for the public safety. The House was counted out at ten minutes to eight o'clock.

[No title]

[No title]

THE GABN0N-8TRBET MURDER.I

MANIFESTO OF THE EMPEROB OF…

THE GREAT EASTERN AND THE…

THE ALLEGED CASE OF MURDER,…

[No title]