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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. ..j

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. la the House of Commons, on Wednesday, on going into committee on the Tests Abolition (Oxford) Bill, Mr. Neate moved that the terms of the royal commission oa oaths, declarations, or subscriptions now required to be ta&en may be extended, so that it may include an inquiry into those taken in the universities either of Oxford or Cambridge, as a condition for admission to the governing bodies of either of such universities, or to the headships or fellowships of any of the colleges thereof, or that another commission msy be appointed to make such inquiry. 1' Sir a. Grey said that it waa not within the scope and in- tention of those who appointed the commission on oaths tion of those who appointed the commission on oaths ai'l declarations to include precisely the_ tests now under 'discussion: but it was, nevertheless, quite competent to inquire into the declarations taken in the universities, but lot with a view to their abolition, for that would be too Jarge a power in regard to a subject which ought to be dealt *ith by legislation. But on the whole he thought it unde- to assent to the amendment. lis was withdrawn. lylr. P. Wyndham, believing that the religious reaching (lIf the university would not be interfered with by the opera- tion (if this bill, should support it. The House then went into committee. Sir W. Heathcote moved an amendment m the hrst clause, the object of which was to assimilate the practice in Oxford to that which exists in Cambridge, namely, that the degree Of master of arts should not necessarily, and without the I'A,oseription of the usual declarations, create eligibility for Membership of the convocation; bat enabling such masters arts to preside over private halls. Sir. Coleridge opposed the amendment. After observations from Mr. B. Hope, The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that the amend- ment which proposed to assimilate the state of things in Oxford to that which existed now in Cambridge, could not be treated as an inconsiderable advance. In regard to inter- venes oil behalf of the proposal by the Government, he was uaabie to speak for the Government; but he would say that h settlement of the question involved was one worthy of elng undertaken by a Government. It was desirable to do this by a comprehensive measure, which should extend to colleges as well as universities, for it was impossible to draw a ^tinction between the religious teaching of colleges and uni- versities. Apart from the desire, in which he participated to ^stendthe benefits ofuui versityeduation as widelyas possible wag indispensable to consider the ° parents o £ England—of that class which send their sons to universi- ties, and which is uniform in its religiousi feeling; and he deprecated the nibbling by Parliament at the principles on ^hich university education is founded. All legislative change regard to universities should be decided,^but also as rare possible. It was said that after giving tne dissenter his gegree, it was invidious to exclude him i-rota convocation; W was it not more invidious, especially looking to the nature of the reward and its emoluments, to exclude km from a fellowship? and this distinc- tion was not touched by the bill. He was of opinion that everything in the way of honour, emolument, and go- vernment should be given to the dissenter, so far as was consistent with the maintenance of the religious teaching Of the university. 0 Mr. G. Duff should have wished to have heard the speech just delivered from the lips of any other person than the leader of the Liberal party. He stated that for some time J>ast a feeling had sprung up in Oxford that it was desirable to remove some of the disabilities which narrowed the Sphere of education in the university, and the present and similar bills had been the result, Sir S. Northcote supported the amendment. Sir S. Northcote supported the amendment. Mr. Evans expressed his disappointment at finding Mr Gladstone opposing this very moderate measure ofuiiiversit7 J3form, though he was not altogether surprised at it. After further debate, Lord J Manners made some vehemenu remarks on the course taken by Mr. Gladstone in temporarily taking the Wednesday leadership from the Home Secretary, in order to make a powertul speech against this bill, and then taking his departure with an intention not to vote at all. Sir G. Grey said that the Home Secretary had no special commission to lead the House on Wednesdays; and, as r-garded the subjects discussed on those days, they were of Jttch a character that members of all political opinions dif- «fed upon th°m. and that difference extended to members °? Government of both parties. He supported the bill. 0 After observations in rsply to the speeches delivered from air W. Heathcote and Mr. Coleridge, On a division the amendment was nega,tived-2.1,5 to 172. i'ae clause was agreed to, as were the others, and the Souse resumed.. Mr. C. Barry moved the second reaamg of the Poor-law Belief (Ireland) Bill, the object of which is to alter the System of rating for the relief of the poor, by substituting Assessment by unions for that by electoral districts. Mr. Gregory moved the rejection of the bill, contending1 that the circumstances of the two countries were 030 alfferet, '"hat it was not politic or expe^ent to apply the s une pan Ciple of rating to Ireland as that which prevailed in Jimg ianLord C. Hamilton was speaking at a quarter to six, "when the debate was perforce adjourned. The other business was disposed of, ana the House ad- journed shortly before six o'clock.

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