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PARLIAMENTARY J OrrrlN GSt…

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PARLIAMENTARY J OrrrlN GSt Evek since the Whitsuntide recess the House of Commons has been the arena of a desperate battle. Parties, were found to be so equally balanced that any slight failure on the part of the Government would, it was thought, lead to their overthrow as a Ministry. Amendment after amendment was introduced, and member after member rose; some to advocate the Ministerial measure in its complete form, and others to oppose the introduction of any or every clause. A storm set in which has not been seen in the House of Commons for the last seven years, and the Opposition, as they waxed stronger and stronger by the Adullamite members seceding from the Liberal party, accused the Government, and Mr. Gladstone in particular, of sticking to office whilst the feelings of the House were against them. In vain did the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer attempt to conciliate; in vain he told the members that the amendments proposed could be argued in committee, and acceded to by the J Government, if found to be iU8^ ^o, his Re- distribution Bill had made his friends his ene- j tnies, and, one by one, the Liberal members who Tere affected by the change rose and announced their intention of voting against the bill and joining the Opposition. The fight was hard on both sides, and was seriously felt hy the Ministers. Sir Eainald Knightley moved a resolution to the effect that the treatment of bribery and corruption lit elections should form part of the bill then before the House. Mr. Gladstone pooh-poohed the amendment, and thought it was done with. To the surprise of the Ministers, however, up rose 4r. Lowe, and in one of the most powerful speeches he ever made electrified the House. Another and kaother "Adullamite" arose, and sundry com- munications passed between the Treasury Bench 4ad the whipper-in. Lord Cranborne added the height of his arguments in favour of the amend- ment, and a division became necessary. Members on both sides looked fidgety; a crisis was arriving, they Were well aware; and from the appearance of the House the Ministers knew the division would be close. Still Mr. Brand's smiling face gave confi- dence to the supporters of the Government, and the long-experienced" whipper-in" calculated upon ft majority of fifteen. The usual forms having been gone through, the Liberal members entered into the lobby as if certain of victory. The first inti- mation of danger was when the Ministerial tellers entered frst, for it is always adjudged that the I tellers who have least to do must complete their Work before their opponents. The result now Was anxiously looked for, and all the numbers Wing been recorded, the four tellers advanced the table, and the return was handed to Sir Eainald Knightley and Lord Cranborne, the Opposition tellers. This intimated at J "fcce which way the division had gone, and loud I prolonged cheers came from Opposition Caches, the Adullamites on the Ministerial side J the House echoing the applause. At last the lumbers were given—"The ayes to the right, 248; '<le noes to the left, 238. A majority of ten gainst the Government. The voices of the Opposition were now raised to a complete roar, ^Qie members even clapped their hands—a scene J^dom witnessed, in th« House of Commons. Mr. ^adstone looked pale and dejected. He shortly tose, however, and declared his intention of going- with the bill, relying upon the mover of the %endmentand his party to supply hinx with details which to act when the bill should be brought be- fOre the committee. You would have thought this 4sufficient opposition for one night, but ,no, there Jfcs another Richard in the field; and Captain 4hyter, the son of that Sir William Hayter who "a.s so lOBg a whipper-in" of the Whig party, Sved an amendment—or rather a resolution, jBaxise it was put in a substantive form—to the jV^cfc that the system of grouping proposed in i 6 present bill before the House for the redistri- tion of seats is neither convenient nor equitable, that the scheme of her Majesty's Government 18 Hot sufficiently matured to form the basis of a ^tisfactory measure." The debate upon this was Mourned; and, when Wednesday came, another ftemy appeared in the camp in the shape of Mr. who, though a professed Liberal, proposed a in which an educational test should be added '0 the property right of the franchise; this was well supported that the Government feared other defeat, which would assuredly have come i not the bill been absolutely talked oat. majority of the great speakers had their say the subject-Mr. Gladstone, Lord R. Mon- Mr. Whiteside, Mr. Bright, the Attorney- d, Lord Cranborne, and Mr. Locke. The uer-in looked uneasy. The time when the eaker sat down was twenty minutes past at a quarter to six the debate must close, be- j Wednesday is always a morning sitting, 'inencing at noon. A new member came to the cue, Mr. Montague Chambers, and he appeared 3 "be only warming to his argument when he was ■^Htely pulled down, and the Speaker pronounced 1J.e House adjourned. Mr. Chambers appeared, ^prised, as if he did not know the rules of the it but there were those who contended that r^as only acting. ■The adjourned debate on Captain Hayter's ration was brought forward again on Thursday, t¡eu Mr. Goschen fairly won his spurs at last by 1b. excellent speech in favour of the bill, delivered 1 1 a greatly improved manner. He has now got the nervousness of the newly-fledged Cabinet ^Ulster, and talks sensibly and well. Sir John j^kington was as prosy as usual, favouring the! with his quarter seaaion eloquence for Jj-'Ont an. hO'Ui' a half. He had, however, merit of calling up Mr. Mill to expose in a few boxt and telliBg sentences the ttnyi-apresentatioTis "Which his opinions had been the subject. He accused by Sir J. Pakington of caiijng the °Hservativea a stupid body. He assessed, how- el', amid considerable laughter, that he did not a.:n that, every Conservative must be stupid, 1¡t that every stupid person must be Con- .Native. Baring the dinner hour smalliaem- be1:¡; talked to empty benches, but when it Ame known that Mr. Lowe was to speak, the ^°Use filled to overflowing. When he rose, the ^Hgervatives greeted their champion with a 'l'm and encouraging burst of cheering, an(I uue, 19 t hon. gentleman delivered another of those arka e addresses which have made his name great. The brightness of his wit, the pungency i his satire, and the felicity of his illustra- j*°hs were never more splendid. For nearly two *°Urs- he held the eager attention of the House, d his sitting down was the signal for one of the ^oet remarkable demonstrations that I have ever 6en in the House of Commons. Uot only was the peering much longer and louder than usual, but Opposition, unable to suppiess their pent-up ('v flings in the usual Parliamentary manner, had ^course to clapping of hands. The Attorney* general, who rose after, was faiut and weak ^side him, and what would otherwise have been good speech was scarcely noticed, and received applause even from the Government side of the "ouse. At Mr. Disraeli s suggestion, the division upon ^is debate was to take placa on Monday. How -iously the time was looked forward to! was to be the overthrow of the Minis- «y, said many» the Government supporters bunted upon fifteen viajovity; but atl were ••^nvinced a great crisis Was .coming on. 1 attended the House as usual on this day, but aOon discovered that there was no earnestness a-boub the debate. We were all convinced that xmderstasdingr bad arri^edl at, JLo:rd, | John Manners made no sensation; Mr. Bernal j Osborne told every one a bit of his mind," and showed that all had erred and strayed from their way like lost sheep he abused the Government, S but he abused the Opposition also, and, in the end, I contended that the Ministers were right, and he should support them. Lots of small fry rose on either side, but no one cared to hear them. Later in the evening, Mr. Gladstone spoke well to his -subject, and was willing to conciliate in any way. Mr. Disraeli exposed the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer's failings, and then the mover of the resolu- tion, Captain Hayter, declared his intention of with- drawing his amendment, being satisfied that the Go- vernment would accede to his request in committee. Lord Elcho was indignant and desired a division. The.- Government, feeliri strong, also wanted to divide, but the Conservatives in a body rushed into the lobby, leaving the House rather than ex- hibit themselves in a minority.. It was a laugh- able farce; the Ministers enjoyed it much, and thus the anticipated defeat ended. The House went into committee upon the bill. Clause by clause will be discussed during the next week, and, in the end, one of the most moderate reforms ever introduced will be passed, with sundry modi- fications to suit the tastes and feelings of the Opposition, as well as the AduUamites or Middle party.

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