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AGRICULTURE.\

HINTS UPON GARDENING. '-

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. --

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THE STRIKE OF THE SEAMEN IN…

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A DOCTOR'S BILL.I

SUPPOSED EXTENSIVE FRAUDS.

EEL FARE IN THE THAMES.

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EEL FARE IN THE THAMES. Eel fare has once more become an institution of the Thames. This onrioas occurrence in the migra- tions of the eel has not taken place, so far as we know, for eighteen years. In 1848 we remember a very small eel fare," not perhaps visible in the ordinary way, but nevertheless a vast number of little eels did then ascend the river in the month of May. Since then these migrations have entirely ceased. Lately, how- ever, large numbers of small eels, some three or four inches in length, have made their appearance in the neighbourhood of Twickenham, working their way up stream in the usual fashion; and though the quantity is far short of that usually seen as eel fare in open and wholesome rivers, there is no question that a very large number of little strangers" have been and are making their way up to re-stock the upper waters of the Thames. To those of our readers who may not be acquainted with the natural history of the eel we may briefly ex- plain what eel fare" is. Towards the autumn the greater body of the large eels migrate down stream to the brackish water caused by a mixture of the fresh and salt, there to deposit their eggs. The eel is ex- ceedingly sensitive to cold, and it is supposed that, as the brackish water is warmer than either the salt or the fresh, instinct leads the eels thither as most suit- able to the hatching operations. There is no doubt that the great bulk of the young eels are born in the brackish water. As soon as the spring has set in and the air becomes warm (usually in the month of May), these little eels collect in vast swarms and commence a migration up stream again, and may often be seen, like a broad black border, lining either bank of the river for a considerable distance. Nothing appears to stop them, and the pertinacity with which they surmount falls and pass looks and wriggle over wairs, even by making the dead bodies of their companions stepping-stones to their own progress is one of the wonders of nature. The migration often lasts for many days in the I course ot which myriads of fry spread themselves over the various waters they pass through, and in due time they grow and are caught and sold as fine Thames eels at Is. per pound. There is no more delicious, wliole- some, or nourishing fish than a Thames eel. Eel fish- ng was at one time an industry of some importance on the Thames. They have been soarce of late years, however, owing to the great migration of small eela kpiown as eel fare" being cut off by the foul state of the river in London. This difficulty now appears to be overcome, and there is no doubt that in a year or two we shall once more have an abundance of fine Thames eels. It has also been an excellent year for lamperns—better than has been known for many years; while flounders have once more visited our waters at Twickenham and its nelghbollrhood. Thou- sands of little creatures, an inch or so i. length, may be seen scuttling off by the score when disturbed by a footstep; and this is also a sight which has not been seen there for nearly 20 years. Sunday Times. —

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FACTS AND FACETIAE. 0