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I k '■,,.'''-PARLIAMENTARY…

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k PARLIAMENTARY JOTTINGS. THERE are 30 many rumoured changes in the Cabinet and so much uncertainty as to who shall sit oil the Ministerial bench in the forthcoming Session, that I do not at present vesture to specu- late upon how many of Lord Palmeraton's late Government shall give in their adherence to Earl Russell. The rumour last week that Mr. Layard hadresigned, was published in all the London papers ^ndcontradictedagain the next day. The Telegraph, however, toot upon itself to say thatthehon. gentle- man tendered his resignation, but was persuaded by Earl Russell to continue in office, notwithstanding that his views differed somewhat from the noble lord's. It is not safe, to depend upon any other than official" authority for these matters. One thing only at present, is certain-viz., that Mr. Qxischen, one of the members for the City of -London, has, after only three years' experience in the House of Commons, been Ta Cabinet Minister, giving him the title of Kight Hon. to his Same. This is an honour that very few men obtain at so early a period of their political 8areer. There is a in the country that blood should be introduced into the Ministry, and Mr. Q-oschen htoi 81 ehance of showing his ability and if possesses any extraordinary business capacities there; is every opportunity If his eventually obtaining the -highest posi- tion- open to'». Commoner.j lit Was tfemarked that fitting the last Session of Parliamen t Mr. Goschen took his seat immediately behind the Treasury Pencil, and the Chancellor of the Exchequer was een to consult him when any difacult, subject of "Xi was introduced j ,and it is now be- t that it was at .Mr, Gladstone's par- '4T request that Mr. Goschen was asked ke a seat in the Cabinet. Time will show aher such an appointment is a happy one. A "ast quantity of new, bloqd was imported into ^he House of Commons at 4ie'la?t election; up- '^ds' of 200 members take theiy ^e^ts for the first time, and many 0 Ithem are' very young m^ri.; -°rty of them are under thirty years of age. The ^ungest is the Earl of Tyroney who is only jufet J ^rned twenty-one j of the others, the Hon. I;, de yeyj Lord C. J. Hamilton} arid the Hon. C. R; Oarf i^Jton, are twenty-two, the Hon. V. Dawson, twenty-three, Captain Stanley and Mr. A. Greville, i^enty-four; nine members have just turned p'snty-five. The: rest of the forty vary from f ^nty-si?; to twenty-^nine. -jit has been, said by many that the present ^-ilistry are till becoming old men. Wow, with the option of Earl Russell, who is in his 74th year, ho pgmaiiider have not reached three score and the allotted period given to man in the Serip- ^es. gjr G. Grey is sixty-seven, Sir Charles {•'ood, sixty-six, Mr. Milner Gibson, fifty-eight, Gladstone, fifty-six, Mr. Cardwell, fifty-two, 5arl Granville, fifty, Duke of Argvle, forty-two, de Grey and Ripon, thirty-eight, and r1*- Goschen, thirty-four. I am sorry to say, wwever, that Earl Russell appeals very in-; •jfaa3- he looks far older than Lord iPal-: aid this time last year, and though „ Cental faculties are perhaps as strong s ever, his walk is very feeble, and his articula- Ca*? Tery ^eak.( Hia lordship has, during the va- "l°n,^allowed tis moustache and beard to grow, this on has small face is not very becoming, uj. Gladstone looks well and strong, as i'f he had; f'^raed himself during the holidays for. any amount °fWork. *i'i'f. In contrasting the present stdtte1 'dr ptilitics the past, what a change we perceive There Ho excitement in the nation now. It) is true no excitement, in the nation now. It is true erybödycries Reform, but then both sides of the ^ouse agree that a reform of some kind is Jecessary. An extension of the franchise, Mr. ■"israeli, as well as Mr. Gladstone, acknowledges be wanting; but whilst Mr. Bright^ and others *aut the respectable inhabitants of the kingdom We votes beyond those who are legitimate it wpuld appear tb#t all; those who themselves Whigs, as well as the Con- think that>the privilege should'be con-; to ratepayers. Thqre is, liowWer, ho ckitward Jr?otlstration such as carried the late Reform Bill, I th therefore, Ministers have a right to believe: the country are not anxious about the matter. Br.r. curious how changed> too, are the £ ^icians of our day compared with the ci^' We have now gseat meetings at ti where'seerets of Ministers. are allowed rj_ Ooze out. We -have had 'several Cabinet it,f il°ils lately, but the publie have not yet been "eg lJaed what the policy of the Government will tior even, what are, the new lentuies in Earl v Cell's Reforpi Bill. With all this, however, the: axe contented,, and exhibit no extraordinary' v ^08ityfor particulars before they are fully de_- \t 9M. We see no squibs about, no reflections ;• ;the character of this Minister or. that,- th6 k person that indulges in any thing of the in 3s Punch, and what he utters is set down as a >683 joke. •i '1 T ij,11 contrast to this, how many anecdotes have, I concerning the old times of George III., Gt,611 James's-street was, in the words of j Wes Pox, the 'earn pus martius" of western v^on. Jjs»er3 the beaux' oavalry paced to and fro, K°*e they took the field in Rotfcen-row; Brookes's Blues and Weltze's Light Sragoocs, 1 4 °UEtad in files and,ogled in p1atoons. ) sivl there, at any time between the hours of two. J)e ■our W the afternoon, might be seen at that tK^ering or lounging rquhd the doors of t>! nearly all the leading politicians f would be Fox, with his pon- B^TJisteP, and good-natured smile • a 7-grave, Btat^ a^d formal Sheridan, with PotrCe T^hi^^ited a taste for old co\o; ?,n<^ -h:„ denominated claret- wi?h intellig^blaJ Wea woul(J ^^ewouwSfcract allheSi, a«d ^1S atEr, -r^nVinf^' then there was the I Hon. Charles would walk e»ew.+ th heavy fier^ -ov, and be silent sMr>n-° Suilennes3 > afa to the othft Been Duadas from one party to^eoth^ giving BOfe neWtJ Wyndha^n&f merrK S4ri «V? rever he went, ^ni,ie '^ith his 4 'S1 &g™e> agile step, arid ^nance, ir ^^itbread, with his PeP?e tev 5oat, shoulders and powerful 'Jiere 6 bo cheap papers in those daj s, a P j /Was known about politics except ngj, !■ aj ^pper and middle classes of socle y« ey poet laureate, however, who was ca-« /J? Apollo, and through him we get hoM fy humorous anecdotes of the period. .f "'notice one of his skits, for the amusement I Adders i— William Pitt, then Prime Minister, Lord Chan- < J1' Tmirlow, and Dundas, President of the of Control, went to visit Mr. Jenkinson, who afterwards Earl Liverpool, at his house near ( '^bledon. On their return home they found t ? toll^oar open; so they rode on, laughing at I Itg ible to evade payment for their horses; but j collector thought it no laughing matter, and, •^ingfroni his sleep, called to them to stop, but, ^Qg they 'determined to proceed, he fired a "bine leaded with slugs after them,, which 12ecl them t70 halt. When the man saw who ).1 were, he begged pardon, but thought that :fJy belonged be a party of robbers who had. for e time been committing depredations in the ^ghbouraood." This afforded Captain Morria ( opportuaity of ridiculing the members of that .^Histry to witicl,- lie, was opposed., ;The following 11:8 are a. parody of a song, written in the American.style, called "Men of Boston," which was very popular at that time:- Sit down, neighbours all, and I'll tell you a merry j story, Aboüt a British farmer, and Billy Pitt, the Tory; I had it piping hot from Ebenezer Barber, Who sailed right from England and lies in Boston harbour. This Billy Pitt is called Britannia's prime ruler, Though he be but a puppet that's hung out to fool her; Bat his name was a passport to let in older sinners,^ So he deals out the cards that the knaves may be winners. Now it happ'd to the country he went for a blessing, And from his State dad to get a new lesson He went to Daddy Jenky, with Trimmer Hal attended, Good lack! in such company how his morals must be mended! This Harry was always a prime foe to,,BoRton,' I With bowels so greedy, they yearned for Hindostan; 1 If I had him in our township I'd feather him and tar him, With forty lacking one, too, I'd lam him and I'd scar him. With their skixis^fuil of wine, and their heads full of State tricks, Sham reforms, commutations, and the rest of their late tricks He came back with Harry—two birds of a feather- Ana, both drunk as pipers, they knocked their heads •together, He then proceeds to ten how they lost their way and got benighted, till at length, they reached a cottage and aroused a countryman" who, taking up a gun, warned them off. the premises. Pitt get in EL, fright,, and the poet continues Now Billy began for to make an oration, As oft he had done to bamboozle the nation But Hodge cried, "Begone, or I'll crack thy young ,rie crown for Thou belong'st to a rare lot of rogueSj- I'll be bound for't." The whole con clucling with theyar,kee chorus-- SoUd men of Boston, oamsh strong potationo(-, Solid men of Boston, make no long orations; Solid men of Boston, go to bed at sundown, And never lose your way, like the loggerheads of London. This skit was immensely popular. The story in the song, as my readers will see, is much varied from the tifue -state of the case; but I presume this is only a fair poetical licence. It was sung in the streets of London, and everybody knew the meaning. It was even quoted in Parliament in Pitt's presence. Sheridan's habits of intemperance were well known; and in an attack Burke made upon him in the House of Commons he finished aome sarea-stic remarks upon the political conduct of his opponent by repeating the lines:- Soliclmenof Boston, banish strong potations, Solid men of Boston, make no long orations. which were received with immense laughter. Sheridan, however, was never at a loss, and as Burke sat, down he rose, and after making allusion to some presumed negotiation between Burke and the Ministry, he happily brought in the following two lines from the same ballad:— He went to Daddy Jenky, by Trimmer Hal attended, Good lack I in such company, how his morals must be mended! The reader rnustunderstand that Jenky (Jen- k in son) wag said to be the immediate channel of communication between the king and the minister, and' it h&d been imported that a change of ministera &rtci bhtbt -already had the Hon. W. -cati3c Jen kin son cotMnumcatgd with Burke as the king's mouthpiece, and that Trimmer Hal was intended for Sir Harry Dandas. Next week I shall probably be better able to ten your readers what is going forward in connection with the opening of Parliament, and the week; afterwards I shall be able to narrate to you what occurs not only in the body of the House, but in the ncoks and corners of St. Stephen's-hall..

,J" MR. MILNER GIBSON AT AS…

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- I THE ALLEGED SUICIDE OF…

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" A REGENT PRIZE EIGHT.

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