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THE BIRMINGHAM WORKING MEN'S…

COMMITTAL OF TWO YOUNG LADIES…

DEATHS FROM DESTITUTION.

UNVEILING THE ALBERT MONUMENT…

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UNVEILING THE ALBERT MONUMENT AT COB UPG. The special correspondent, in writing from Coburg on Saturday night, says:— The ceremony is over, and the whole of the pro- ceedings may be pronounced a grand success. There was nothing wanting to make the celebration all that could be desired, not a hitch or contretemps of any kind occurred. The weather has been magnificent in the extreme, if anything too brilliant and warm. The scene of to-day's celebration Was, as already remarked, the market-place, which had been besieged by crowds of spectators since an early hour in the day. On arriving there at three o'clock, and showing the ticket I had received through the courtesy of the burgo- master, I was at once admitted to the gallery set apart for visitors from a distance. This occupies the east side of the market- place, and, like the two tribunes or galleries reserved for persons of distinction, and standing on the west and north sides, was tastefully deco- rated with evergreens. By a little after three o'clock every available seat Was oscttpiefl in all t the three spacious galleries. On the south side Was erected an elegant raised pavilion intended for the Queen, the Royal and Daeai families and guests of princely rank, together wiih_ diplomatists and Ministers of the highest class, lb was some time time before the Eoyal guests made their appearance, and in the interval there was opportunity to observe what was passing. The scene presented by the market-place was in the highest degree brilliant and animated. Stretching from the two extremities of the Royal Pavilion, and meeting at the monument, so as to forma semicircle, were two double lines of maidens, attired in w-hite, one half of them,those to the left of the Pavilion, wearing a red sash, carried round the waist and over the left shoulder, while their companions on the right half of the semicircle wore sashes of dark green. All the maidens wore garlands round their heads, and each carried a chaplet of ever- greens and flowers in her hand. This portion of the spectacle was extremely tasteful and pleasing. Fiom the windows of every house about the market-place as well as from a hundred tall and painted flag-poles, regularly arranged along the galleries, streamed num- berless flags and banners of every nation whose Royal house was interested in the ceremony. At a quarter to four his Serene Highnsss Duke Ernest, the reigning sovereign, drove up with the duchess from the castle to the Pavilion. In rapid succession followed the Prince and Princess of Wales, the Crown Prince and Princess (the Princess Eoyal) of Prussia, Prince Louis and the Princess (Alice) of I Hesse, the Grand Duke and Grand Duchess of Baden, Duke Ernest of Wurtemberg, Prince Christian of -Schleswig-Holstein-Augustenburg, and the Duchess Adeheid (specially invited by her Majesty), Prince Augustus of Sasoiay, Prince Philip and Princess Amalie of Saxony, the Duke and Duchess ctf Brabant, Princes Alfred and Arthur and Princess Helena of Great Britain. Ten minutes after the arrival of the last of the Royal company the guns of the fort began to fire, announcing the fact that her Majesty was leaving the palace. In another minute the Royal carriage, preceded by a number of outriders, came in sight, the band strnek up "God save the Qieea," and at length we saw her Majesty, accompanied by her three youngest children. The ceremony of reception by the Duke was quickly over, and iwr Majesty, after Kissing her daughters, and saluting several of the other guests, took her seat in the place of honour in the front centre of the Pavilion, immediately opposite the statue. The Queen, like her royal children, appeared in the best of health, A few seconds afterwards the Gesang- vereine sang a chorale to the air of the English national anthem. The Burgomaster of the capital then stepped ia front of the statue and delivered a brief address. In 'another second the signal was given, the veil was drawn, down, and a splendid gilt bronze statue of the Prince Consort, designed by Theed, of London, and exeauted by Leonz-Harold, of Nurem- burg, was disclosed, to view. During the solemn I silence that reigned over that vast assembly while the Burgomaster uttered his speech, it was evident to one aear the Pavilion that the moment was more than usually trying to more than one of the British Prineesses in the front rank. Her Majesty was likewise deeply affected, but suppressed as much aa possible the external expression of her natural feelings. After a solemn silence of a few seconds another chorale was sung by the assembled musical societies; then the maidens, aaiid the pealing of the church belkiand thunder of the guns, went in order to deposit their gariandson theraiiing of the statue. With this the appointed ceremonies, as-laid down in the programme.* were over. But her Majesty sig- nified her wish to walk down a.nd inspect the statue more closely. In a few minutes a path was cleared, and the Queen, followed by her children and the whole of the princely guestsl In their order of precedence, passed through the crowd and approached the monu- ment. Her Majesty walked tStowly round it, inspect- ing every detail with the greatest interest, and express- ing the highest approval of the whole work. The return to the pavilion, the departure of the Roy al party and all the company under deafening cheers, repeated in the case of the Prince of Wales, the Crown Prince of Prussia, the Duke of Saxe Coburg, and the Grand Duks of Baden, was all the work of a few seconds. Then occurred a final cha- racteristic incident. The church bells were ringing their merry peals, and the crowd had broken up, when the band again suddenly struck up the air of God Save the Queen," A road was rapidly opened in the dense masses, and we saw that, after leaving the guests at the neighbouring palace, her Majesty, ,e.tJ'J'<L_. to take one last fond look at the statue df her late; consort on the day of its inauguration. Her Majesty slowly drove round the monument, gazing on it with the deepest interest, amid the respectful silence of the crowd. At last the Royal carriage moved away, tak- ing the Queen from our view, and thus bringing to a conclusion a festival as successful in all external re- spects as it was touching and beautiful in its inner meaning.

THE MURDER OF MAJOR HE VERB.

CONVICTIONS FOR SELLING DISEASED…

UTTERING COUNTERFEIT COIN…

THE ROAD MURDER.

THE FRAUDH ON THE BIRMINGHAM…

FRIGHTFUL DEA TH OF AN INSURANCE…

SUICIDE OF A YOUNG WOMAN AT…

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;=."''' CHOLERA PANTO IN SICILY.

----'-__----___---' THE CATTLE…

A OATTLE PLAGUE IN AMERICA.