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AGRICULTURE. --+--

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AGRICULTURE. --+-- Three competitive exhibitions of cattle, machinery, and farm produce were held in Lancashire, namely, at Worsley, near Manchester, Ormskirk, and Accrington. The last named was the show of the North Lancashire Society, but was confined to machinery and a trial of implements, the more generally attractive though not more important exhibition commencing on Thursday, when some splendid specimens of the bovine class were exhibited. At Worsley, the president, theHon. Algernon Egerton, M.P., observed, that if some of the many small societies now dotted over South Lancashire were to amalgamate it would conduce to the interests of agriculture. The Cause of Mildew in Wheat. A correspondent of the Standard, writing upon this subject, says "Having seen some accounts of the mildew in wheat, and there being much of it this year, I venture to give you my opinion as to the cause of it. Having now been sixty years engaged in agricultural pursuits, I have acquired some knowledge on the subject. From observation and what I have read upon it, mildew is brought on by over-luxuriance, which, similar to the excess of blood in a human body, must result in pro- ducing disease. We used to have more of it years ago, but draining, grabbing up woods, giving more air, and rolling the land, have checked it, and rendered tlil appearance less frequent; the seasons also have been more favourable. "Tour readers may recollect that on July 6th we had a general thunderstorm in the morning, and after- wards the sun became very hot, and this continued for some days. On the day first mentioned I was at market, and told some young farmers and others that it was the worst day for wheat we had had for some years, as we should have the mildew; and I requested them to examine daily how the wheat went on. I did the same myself, and before a week passed over I drew my finger and thumb up the neck of an ear of wheat, and found it full of small spots. The warm ram and hot sun sent up such an abundance of sap that the ear could not carry it off, therefore it burst in several places and ran down the stem, making it look black after exposure to the air. I always found it in old meadow lands, where ditches or ponds were filled up, and that thin plants were the most affected, the flow of sap being greater in them. This year the wheats were in general thin in plant, and of a very dark green colour, and more likely to have it; besides thin plants have more room to extend their roots, and have a larger supply of sep after sudden changes.

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