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. EPITOME OF NEWS. ---+--

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THE FORESTERS' FETE AT THE…

LOSS OF A BARQUE AND OF THIRTEEN…

. PRINCE ALFRED'S MAJORITY.

A NARROW ESOAPE AMONGST ICE…

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A NARROW ESOAPE AMONGST ICE AND SNOW. A correspondent of the Marichester Examiner gives the following instance of a remarkable escape which he once had on the Faulhorn: Some years ago I spent a very pleasant evening with a German student and two Manchester men, and slept at the small inn on the top of the Faulhorn. Next morning my guide proposed that we should vary our route in the descent. We kept considerably to the right of the track by which we had come up, and arrived soon at the edge oM glen filled with snow, lying on a consider- able slope. The surface of the snow was rotten and LIS ro?gh> and we proceeded to cross it apparently y- half-way across there was a smoother w ^L lW?ar,da wide, like a channel over which in onnt lf ha<? trickled and melted the surface of Myguide, with shoes tipped and heeled, Kwf stick7' I*, I veHtared' tPoP do so, assisted & 7 J LiSst. my footing and fell with a thud on the hard ice. Losing mv hold of the 8tif° LSf l +^ce to 8"P downwards. In a few seconds felt that I had no power to stop myself, and that the speed at which I was slipping became augmented at every yard of descent. In this manner I descended perhaps twenty or thirty yards. The guide, who was running para/el with me down the rough snow, had called out to me to turn myself on my side, and on this producing no retarding effect he directed me to throw myself on my face, and to press the points of my shoes mto the ice, and lastly, as I was passing him rapidly, he told me to roll myself to the side. This I proceeded to do with the utmost vigour, and soon came to a landing in the rough snow; having descended, perhaps, another ten or twenty yards. My hands, knees, and clothes wtre brought to considerable grief, but otherwise I was not much the worse of my rude experience. On gaining my feet and shaking myself into order, I proceeded down the rough snow to see where would have been my destination if my progress had not been thus arrested. The smooth channel referred to continued downwards for about two hundred and fifty yards, at the bottom of which was a mass of snow and stones, into which at express speed I should have rushed headlong. The time occupied in the descent may have been ten seconds, daring which time I retained perfect self-possession, heard every word the guide I said, and had apparently plenty of time to thiak on. £ many subjects. Among others I originated and ma- tured the following invention, and offered on the spot a reward of .£100 to any one who would effect its im- mediate application. The invention consisted in pro- viding one's-self with a strongleather belt, to be strapped round the waist, the back of which made of double Ben, should be provided with a sufficient number of strong, sharp spikes about three or four inches long, made of the best tempered steel and firmly riveted. The initial velocity of the body at the moment of falling is nearly nothing, and I can say from experience that if one retains his faculties-and no one should put himself in such positions unless he can calculate upon that-he has plenty of time to turn upon his back, and when in that position the weight of the body would force the spikes into the snow, and at once arrest the descent.

THE CATTLE PLAGUE.

THE STEP-MOTHER OF CONSTANCE…

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