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OUTLINES OF THE WEEK. ---

B&BBERY AND ATTEMPTED MTJRDEB.

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LOVE, LAW, AND LUNACY.

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LOVE, LAW, AND LUNACY. The case of Brooks v. Clarke was recently brought before the Lord Chief Justice and a special jury in the Equity Court, it was an action brought by Miss Emily Augusta Clarke Brooks against the defendant, who was clerk to the Sadlers' Company, on a bond for X300 a year, and was resisted on the ground that the defendant had executed the bond when in an un- sound state of mind, or that he was in such a condition of health from excessive drinking as not to be fit to transact important business when he signed it; that the bond had been got from him by coercion; and, further, that the plaintiff, after she got it, had delivered it up to be cancelled.—Miss Emily Augusta Clarke Broeks, the plaintiff, said that the defendant, Mr. Giles Clark, a solicitor, was connected with her family by marriage. She was twenty-eighty ears old. Mr. Clarke was her godfather, and by his desire she took the name of Clarke, and she lived in his house with her mother and grandmother from her earliest childhood. She was accustomed to call Mr. Clarke papa, by his own desire. There was a little boy brought there who, her mamma said, was witness's brother, and the defendant called him his son. It was understood that the two children were to share his fortune between them. In 1857 the defendant took her to a ball at Sadler's Ilall, of which company he was clerk, and introduced her as Miss, 4^, °' PjT1*' 1861, she drank some champagne Sht rSfrfiH6^ • a din-n6r party at their house- She retired late m the evening. After she had been in bed some time she found the defendant in her bed. Before anything took place between them he said, I am your best friend," and that he would provide for her, and she should never want. She consented to his overtures, and the intercourse continued through May and part of June. Early in June she was desirous to get a day situation as governess, so that she could reside with her grand- mother, who then lived in the defendant's house. The defendant was annoyed at this, and said that witness had nothing to fear, for he would provide for her. In the middle of May the defendant said he had taken a house at Southend, and should remove his furniture there. Some furniture was to be given to witness, and she was to reside in Chase Cottage, Hampstead with her grandmother. He said he would provide for witness for life. In reference to the house at South- end, he said it was for a lady of fortune, to whom he was to be married. After this he took her to Sadlers'- hall ball, where he introduced her to members of his family. After the ball he repeated his promises. On another occasion he said he would make a settlement providing for witness and her grandmother for life.. On the 17th or 18th of May he sent for two copies of the form of a bond, and he filled up one and handed it to fitness, saying, "Now I have provided for you lor lite. The bond now produced, that sued on, was the one. After some further evidence, the Lord Chief Justice suggested, before the case went further, the propriety of considering whether some arrangement could not be come to.—Upon this suggestion a long consultation took place between the counsel, which resulted in a settlement, the defendant paying the plaintiff £ 1,000.—A juror was then withdrawn.

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