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" IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. --

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SHE NEVER TOLD HER LOVE.

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RATHER ELEVATED.I

SINGULAR ACTION FOR FALSE…

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SINGULAR ACTION FOR FALSE IMPRISONMENT. Deemster Drinkwater, the chief judge of the Isle of Man, presided over a special jury, which was occupied on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday last, in assessing the damages in the case of James Bro vn v. Twenty- one members of the House of Keys." The circum- stances of this case are as follows:—The House of Keys is the lower branch of the Legislature of the Isle of Man, and it consists of twenty.four members!, who adopt the highly convenient plan of electing them- selves, and that for life, thus doing away with all the inconveniences of popular election, to say nothing of the expense. As may be supposed, a body of tbis anomalous description does nOR enjoy much popu- larity. In February, 1864, the Commissioners of Douglas, a rapidly rising watering-place, brought be- fore this self-elected body a bill for the further improve- ment of the town, and this measure, after spending four entire days in discussing it, the Keys kicked out. making, during their deliberations, many insult- ing remarks concerning the Commissioners. This course excited much indignation, and strongly con- demnatory articles appeared in two of the local journals, the Isle of Man Times and Mona s Herald. For these articles the proprietors, Mr. Brown and Mr. Fagher, were summoned to the "bar of the House," and asked to apologise. Mr. Brown refused to do this, and demanded, as a British subject, to be tried by a jury, and to be allowed to employ counsel. Both requests were refused, and the refractory journalist was sentenced to six months' imprisonment in the common gaol. Mr. Fagher, warned by Mr. Brown's fate, consented to apologise, and the "Keys" graciously consented not to lock him up. The statutes under which the House of Keys professed to exercise their powers were passed in 1677 and 1817. Shortly after his committal to prison, Mr. Brown applied to the his committal to prison, Mr. Brown applied to the Court of Queen's Bench for a writ of habeas corpus; the application was he aid on the 7th of May, 1864, when the judges at onoe ordered the release of Mr. Brown; he was set at liberty the same day, having been seven weeks and a half in custody. He then brought an action for damages against the House of Keys." This suit, as above stated, occupied three days in the hearing, four lawyers having been em- ployed on each side. The jury, after deliberating four hours, returned a verdict for Mr. Brown, the plaintiff, damages .£518 19s. 6d. It is estimated that the action will cost the members of the House of Keys about £ 900.

THE ALLEGED HOMICIDE AT STEPNEY.|

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